Broadcast #3 Final

Good Morning Siouxland, Thank you for tuning into Early Bird Radio. This is your host Makaelyn Glienke and today we have some fun topics to discuss.

We all dreamed about winning the lottery, but for this man in Massachusetts he not only won the lottery, but won it twice. 

His name is Rolf Rhodes and he won $1 million dollars out of the “$4 million dollar Instant Jackpot” game out of a gas station in Mendon, Massachusetts. 

He previously won $1 million dollars in 2018. Rhodes first winning ticket was in Milford, Massachusetts, which is just a town next to Mendon. He is one lucky person.

Dolie Thompson, a Photography professor, gives us her thoughts as to why the lottery isn’t worth her time.

(insert statement)

However, Professor Thompson did say that if she were to win the lottery by chance she would take her granddaughters out of school and travel the world.

Remember the fun toys you would get with your happy meal at McDonald’s? This year marks the 40th anniversary and McDonald’s is celebrating it by bringing back their classic toys. 

This is happening between November 7 through the 11th and who isn’t excited to see their childhood toys again?

Rae Clinkenbeard, student, tells us what she thinks about the toys.

(insert statement)

Clinkenbeard likes what they are doing and wishes they would use more toys from kids movies, as they are a collectible piece.

Buying food online has grown so much that popular stores like Walmart and Hy-Vee are creating ‘dark stores’ to get orders completed without the customers around. 

It states on the CNN article, that only 5% of US shoppers buy their groceries online, but the analysts expect that number to rise in the years to come. This gives us room again when shopping at the stores. 

Tracie Tuttle, student, gives us insight into what she thinks about the ‘dark stores’.

(insert statement)

Tuttle mentioned how having the ‘dark stores’ are useful for when the zombie apocalypse happens. Better to think ahead and be prepared.


Tatum Gray revised

On Friday nights when he was younger, Tatum Gray would go with his parents to Friday Night Sand Beer League, a volleyball tournament. This began his love for the sport.

He started watching volleyball games, especially during the Olympics. When he had enough money, he got to purchase his first volleyball. Gray would practice by himself; hitting the ball against the garage. All his practice and hard work paid off. He got so good that he joined a club. Now he plays competitively.

Tatum Gray is a long way from home. Travelling all the way from Granbury, Texas, Gray decided to go to Morningside College. His athleticism has him playing for the volleyball team. He is planning on studying Advertising.

Gray travelled most of the states in the south but never ventured North. He appreciates the environment as he said, “I enjoy it here” and calls it “very pretty and green”.

Story #3 Draft

(Intro Score) – if time

Good Morning Siouxland, Thank you for tuning into Early Bird Radio. This is your host Makaelyn Glienke and today we have some fun topics to discuss.

We all dreamed about winning the lottery, but for this man in Massachusetts he not only won the lottery, but won it twice.

His name is Rolf Rhodes and he won $1 million dollars out of the “$4 million dollar Instant Jackpot” game out of a gas station in Mendon, Massachusetts.

He previously won $1 million dollars in 2018. Rhodes first winning ticket was in Milford, Massachusetts, which is just a town next to Mendon. He is one lucky person.

I asked student, ….., if they ever attempted the lottery or even won anything to which they said, “……”

I also asked what they would do with the money if they won the lottery for the first time.

(insert statement)

Remember the fun toys you would get with your happy meal at McDonald’s? This year marks the 40th anniversary and McDonald’s is celebrating it by bringing back their classic toys.

This is happening between November 7 through the 11th and who isn’t excited to see their childhood toys again?

We asked …. about the McDonald’s toys and what fun toy they remember getting.

(insert statement)

Buying food online has grown so much that popular stores like Walmart and Hy-Vee are creating ‘dark stores’ to get orders completed without the customers around.

It states on the CNN article, that only 5% of US shoppers buy their groceries online, but the analysts expect that number to rise in the years to come. This gives us who still like to shop at the stores room again.

We asked … if they like to grocery shop online or in store and if they like the idea of ‘dark stores’.

(insert statement)

That’s all we have for now. Tune in later for some more fun stories going on in the world. This is Makaelyn Glienke with Early Bird Radio.

This isn’t part of the script but to show you the sources. Click on the links to view the articles: https://www.cnn.com/2019/11/01/us/man-wins-lottery-second-time-trnd/index.html

https://www.cnn.com/2019/11/01/business/mcdonalds-happy-meal-toys-trnd/index.html

https://www.cnn.com/2019/10/30/business/grocery-delivery-pickup-walmart-kroger-stop-and-shop/index.html

CoupleShoot

Breaking News. Groom is missing after shooting newlywed wife.

Richard Brunson, 50, shot his newlywed bride, Laurette Kenny Brunson, 38, at their wedding reception Saturday.

Sargent Mann from the Sioux City Police force said this. (Insert sound.)

Brunson used a .22 caliber handgun on his wife at their home, located 617 Black Street.

Marilyn Corse a witness said, (insert sound)

Brunson’s whereabouts are still unknown.

As for Mrs. Brunson, she is recovering well at St. Luke’s Hospital. She was shot in her stomach.

And now on to other news.

Science Scavenger Hunt

A species of Ophiocordyceps sprouts from Camponotus novogranadensis, an ant species, in Itacolomi State Park in Brazil. Credit João Araújo

Did you know Zombies do exist? A certain fungus is the cause and insects are the victims.

In this recent New York Times article, scientist have studied a fungus that turns ants into zombies. Not like the zombies on The Walking Dead and Zombieland, where they physically attack humans. The fungus called Ophiocordyceps, uses the host to grow more of itself.

When an ant comes into contact with the fungus, fungal cells begin to slip inside the body. The fungal cells will spread and over power the body. Chemical signals are sent to the brain causing the ant to act strange.

The ant leaves its nest. Either kicked out or torn apart by the other ants who noticed the sickness.

The infected ant finds a stationary location close to the nest to infect others. The fungus starts to grow outside of the body. Giant stalks grow through the head. Spores shower over the area.

Thus beginning the process again. Starting with a new ant coming into contact with the fungus.

If you like this story and want to learn more about it, check out our website.

For more information on the article; click on the link: https://www.nytimes.com/2019/10/24/science/ant-zombies-fungus.html

Article #2

The new Chair of the Art Department is just as much an artist, as she is scientist.

Last fall, in 2018, Terri McGaffin, the previous Chair of the Art Department, announced her retirement.

Now, with the fall semester roughly halfway over, let’s see how Prindaville is doing so far in this new journey.

Prindaville traveled from Leavenworth, Kansas. She worked as the Art Program Director at the University of St. Mary for 6 years.

She did an international search and applied for 60 positions that met what she was looking for, to which one of them was Morningside. She was looking for was a strong art program and Morningside had it.

Prindaville was happy to be accepted as the new Chair of the Art Department. She said, “This one, I thought, was the best fit. The people…every step felt like a good fit.”

To which she continued on that the position here kept her career progressing and added extra benefits.

She feels that the program is more academically geared and people seem more serious about it. “The art is healthy here,” she said. The previous school she worked at was geared towards the athletes and not the artists. Prindaville would go on describing the wonderful program and environment Morningside College provides.

Prindaville brings to the campus many talents. She likes to do ecological artwork, she describes as “not so narrow in terms of media but narrow in topic.” She uses a variety of techniques, and typically brings together nature and psychological human traits to her pieces. She does a lot of experimenting as she enjoys science.

Reclamation
Mixed media relief including QuickCure Clay, QuickCure Glaze Coating, acrylic, aragonite crystals, and salt on birch panel, 12×9.25×2”, 2019

She is thankful for Terri McGaffin, even saying that she is amazing. McGaffin, the previous chair of the art department and now the transition coordinator for the department, is helping Prindaville transition by taking some of the many projects that needs to be done.

Not many schools prepare people for their positions and Prindaville is thankful for it.

McGaffin is very confident in Prindaville. She sees potential for more interdisciplinary work to happen. McGaffin points out Prindaville is a multi-disciplinary artist, a scientist and speaks in terms of legal issues. Prindaville is a good example, as students have already been doing this, by not being dedicated to one thing. 

From a student perspective, Freshman, Devyn Reilly, is currently taking two classes, Design and Drawing, taught by Prindaville.

Prindaville’s style of teaching is always on schedule. All the assignments and projects that are described on the syllabus are on time. She rarely makes few adjustments.

In both her classes, Reilly believes that Prindaville is doing a good job at helping her get better at art. All the inputs Reilly has gotten from Prindaville has helped improve her art; from highlights to values.

Fluoresce
Watercolor on recycled paper, 12×9″, 2014

Another student who is currently in one of Prindaville’s class is sophomore, Elise O’Regan. Having had McGaffin and, now, Prindaville teach; O’Regan said there is a difference between the two. She states that McGaffin is a lot more “chill” compared to Prindaville, as she is seen as strict. “That can be a good thing for some and a bad thing for others.” O’Regan mentions.

O’Regan says Prindaville is really friendly and because of her, O’Regan has improved in her Drawing class.

For more information or wanna see more of Prindaville’s art, click on the link: http://shelbyprindaville.com/

Alex Watters: Involved in Sioux City, Involved with Students

City Council member and Career Development Specialist Alex Watters shares stories and answers questions for an interviewing segment in Professor Fulgsang’s Journalism Class.

Growing up in a small town, Watters was a normal child who looked up to his father. His dad was the Sheriff and introduced Watters to politics. Ever since then, he continued with that interest and made it into a career.

Before he got into politics, Watters had a dream to one day be a Golf instructor, as he was very good at it. However, his dream changed when he got into an accident during his Freshman year of college at Morningside. The accident led to him not being able to golf anymore, along with other things.

Once Watters recovered from his accident, he couldn’t fulfill his golf dream anymore. This led to new plans and new dedications, because he still had interest in politics.

After grad school, Watters came back to Sioux City and ran for Board of Supervisors in 2016. He lost. He, then, ran for City Council member the next year. He got in. Watters was able to make changes, and encourage disability access points throughout the city.

Not only does he change lives for the general people of Sioux City, but he helps out students plan their careers as Career Development Specialist at Morningside College.

He has been working at Morningside for 6 years, the Career Services part for 2 years. Watters loves to see the students succeed. It is a fulfillment for him.

Watters is a busy man. You can find him at city events or watching his students play during their games. No matter how busy his schedule is, he always stays optimistic. Watters said, “You truly determine your destiny and what you’re going to do and what you are going to achieve.”

His accident didn’t stop him from continuing on with his life. Now, he motivates others to do the same. “The skies the limit,” he said. It is and Watters will push forward to continue helping others.

Scavenger Hunt on Morningside Campus

A surprise scavenger happened today from my Journalism class.

The objective is to learn how to communicate well and ask questions to strangers.

There were two objects to find; #1 is to get a picture of the subject and #2 is to have a conversation about sports with another subject.

My conversation about sports was with Freshman Emily Cloffelter. She is on the tennis team here at Morningside. She said they are currently practicing during this fall season. Cloffelter said, “I am excited for the season to begin.”

The next object was the photo I got was of Freshman Amber Deuel. She said she enjoys it here at Morningside. She feels like the semester is taking forever so far, but as a senior, I reassured her that time will start to fly by once finals comes around the corner.

Amber Deuel

Final Article #1: Documentary Photographer, Robert Frank, dies at 94.

The photographer Robert Frank, who was known for his visually raw and personally expressive style.
Credit Dodo Jin Ming

Robert Frank, an influential documentary photographer, died last month at age 94.

Frank’s photos were black and white and included a “grainy and blurry” appearance that signified that the American Dream isn’t what it seems as gathered throughout the articles.

Frank would capture photos of people with less fortune in society, because as he stated in The Times Magazine, “My sympathies were with people who struggled. There was also my mistrust of people who made the rules.”

His vision led to his book, “The Americans” featuring photos of his cross country journey of America.

The importance of “The Americans” let people see that everyone is beautifully different. To be an American doesn’t mean you have to look like a movie star or some type of celebrity; you get to be yourself.

Many people did not like Frank’s style of photography. For example, a Popular Photography magazine complained about their “meaningless blur, grain, muddy exposures, drunken horizons, and general sloppiness.”

Frank did not see that in his work. He had a “romantic idea” about “Finding and honoring what was true and good about the United States.”

A memorial to Robert Frank outside his home in New York City.
CreditDrew Angerer/Getty Images

Frank died at Inverness Consolidated Memorial Hospital on Cape Breton Island, Nova Scotia. His photos had made a huge impact on today’s documentary photos.

Gathered from a tribute to Robert Frank in The New York Times, Philip Gefter stated in a creative thought, “I wonder what moments in the lives of today’s immigrant children…Mr. Frank could have captured with his elegantly transgressive photographic lens.” Gefter continues on to “Thank Frank” for his inspiring journey.

The only immediate survivor is his second wife, June leaf, as both his kids have passed; Andrea at age 20 from a plane crash in Guatemala in 1974 and Pablo in 1994.

Born in Switzerland, Frank emigrated to New York at the age of 23. Since he was not originally from the states; he got to experience America through his own eyes. As referred to in The Times Magazine, Frank viewed the United States society through the lens of an outsider to expose the poverty, racism and alienation previously ignored in portrayals of the American dream.

This image of America made it to Europe, as Frank would travel between the countries and he would share his photos there. “The Americans” was released earlier in that country before being released in America.

“‘The Americans’ challenged the presiding midcentury formula for photojournalism,” stated in The New York Times. Frank’s photographs were centered on, “Lone individuals, teenage couples, groups at funerals and odd spoors of cultural life.” The images were “classically composed” and made with a “cinematic” and “grainy” quality like the early television of that time period.

“Mr. Frank had come to detest the American drive for conformity, stripping away the picture-perfect vision of the country.” stated in The New York Times.

Besides taking photos, he also experimented with the moving image. He would often use his first wife and children to play a role in these films. He even made a film solely based on his two kids, Andrea and Pablo, called “Conversations in Vermont”. Yet, the work he made for “The Americans” is the most recognizable thing he did out of all of his work.

Frank would continue to film and take photos throughout the remainder of his life.   

For more information about Robert Frank, click on the links below. https://www.nytimes.com/2019/09/10/arts/robert-frank-dead-americans-photography.html?rref=collection%2Fsectioncollection%2Farts&action=click&contentCollection=arts&region=rank&module=package&version=highlights&contentPlacement=1&pgtype=sectionfront

https://www.nytimes.com/2019/09/13/opinion/letters/robert-frank-retirement-campus.html

https://time.com/5673164/robert-frank-photographer-dies/

His name is Gray, Tatum Gray

First day of class means first impressions as he asked to sit next to me. Tatum Gray is a long way from home. Traveling all the way from Granbury, Texas, Tatum decided to come to Morningside College. A freshman with the athleticism to play volleyball; he is planning on studying Advertising.

Being from Texas, Tatum was able to travel most of the states in the south but never ventured North. Well, welcome to Iowa, Tatum, because things are gonna get a lot cooler soon. The change in scenery didn’t seem to bother him, however, as he said, “I enjoy it here” and calls it “very pretty and green”. Good luck Tatum and have fun with your first year of college!