A Montanan's Outlook

Small State to Big City, Here it Is

Category: News Stories (page 1 of 2)

The ‘Write’ Time: Reintroducing Sioux City to Theatre

Adam

 

Adam Gonshorowski is a rising star in the film and theatre business in our very own Sioux City.

Gonshorowski graduated from Morningside College on May 8th of 2010. A Dakota City, Nebraska native, Gonshorowski was awarded his Bachelor of Arts, one of 479 degrees earned that year. This propelled him forward towards a fascination with the arts.

After graduation, Gonshorowski went on to earn his Master’s in Film Production from Loyola Marymount University. He moved back to Sioux City soon after and began a career in film production and screenwriting.

Though Gonshorowski began with a focus in film and screen, he has recently been transitioning from film to theatre.

Theatre is a recent development in my portfolio of work,” Gonshorowski said, “First and foremost my work has consisted of film and television, but there are different challenges working in that medium that makes theatre more accessible to work in at this time.”

He detailed that his childhood was filled with great movies and films, but rarely theatre. This lack of theatrical “intervention” caused Gonshorowski to lean more towards film production. Sophomore year of high school changed that.

Around sophomore year I picked up an app called Final Draft and a book titled The Screenwriter’s Bible.  The combination of the software and book gave me an insight into writing screenplays and I unlocked the key to writing.” He began to vigorously apply to Graduate schools in Film Production and landed in the middle of the largest city in the film industry: Los Angeles, California.

“I was taught by the best in the business, everyone from J.J. Abrams, Roberto Orci, to my mentor and prolific writer, Jeph Loeb.” Loyola Marymount University left no stone unturned and Gonshorowski believed he was headed towards studio writing.

After three years of some of the best teaching in the world, Gonshorowski made a big move back to Sioux City where his first true production, “The Truman Decision,” is being performed at Evelyn Larson Theatre.“I decided to start my own production company with the goal of producing films, television, and theatre.  That brings us to today after over 15 years of trying to get here.”

Gonshorowski is leading a new era of theatre with self-written productions. Khiana Hume, a Morningside College Freshman with a passion for theatre, explained how she feels about the changing theatre scene.

It’s amazing and is becoming more culturally diverse and inclusive.” Theatre productions are now trying to push the agenda of incorporating differences. Hume also believes that the growth of theatre is acting as a new News medium.

“The audience can relate more to it [theatre] because the modern issues are being presented to them by real people and not a screen.” While Gonshorowski began in the screen industry, he is now pushing the stage and live action. “Most of them [new productions] push boundaries and that is what makes them great because they are original.”

“The more we humanize entertainment the more beneficial it will be for our society,” said Chloe Person, a Freshman English Major from Morningside College.

Gonshorowski is bringing theatre to the people. Self-written and directed plays are getting attention, which surprised Gonshorowski.

“It is amazing the outpouring of support that appeared as if by magic.”

Adam Gonshorowski is bringing Los Angeles to Sioux City, and the magic of the screen to the stage.

Mega City Mall’s Explosion Will Keep Doors Closed Until Further Notice

An explosion just before 10 am in Mega City Mall left 2 dead and close to 100 people injured.

The explosion occurred close to the Dairy Queen in the food court before the opening of the mall. There has been no indication of the cause of the explosion according to Sergeant Fuglsang. No one has yet claimed responsibility for the explosion.

Those injured are in the process of being transported to local hospitals. Names of the deceased will not be released until next of kin is notified, but one is a male from Seargent Bluff and the other is a female from Sioux City.

The Sioux City Police Department is not worried about any follow-up danger and is not referring to this as an attack.

Security footage has been found and given to police, who will review the tapes later today.

 

Before the incident occurred a 12-year-old boy, Stephen, went missing from his mother but has been located and interviewed.

“I was just over by the bungee jump area trying to sneak in. My mom was shopping in boring places. When I heard the explosion I ran to the parking lot and just kept running.”

Stephen and his mother have yet to be reunited but he is in the care of the SCPD.

Nathan Hoogland, a Police Officer himself, was in the vicinity of the mall as he was off-duty. Retired from the FBI bomb squad, Hoogland tried to run towards the site of the explosion but was ushered outside by on-duty police officers.

“I initially ran towards the ‘boom’ but saw a stampede of people coming towards me so I ducked into an alcove to avoid being trampled.”

Hoogland states that he cannot distinguish the source of the explosion.

“I haven’t seen the crime scene, I haven’t seen pictures, so I can’t say what caused the explosion.”

The Mega City Mall will remain closed for the rest of the day and potentially the week depending on damages and the crime scene. A crime scene investigation will need to be conducted before the doors of the mall will reopen, but mall officials hope to open doors soon for holiday shoppers.

Repairs will begin after the investigation.

A second news conference will take place at 3 pm today between Seargent Fuglsang and the media. Updates will be released thereafter.

Sioux City News

 

Hello and Good Morning, this is Mari Pizzini and I am here to give you this week’s news in both Sioux City and the United States.

Our first story focuses on the importance of college sports attendance.

According to a study done by the University of Oregon, sports audience attendance in college is on a major decline.

An audience is an integral part of sports performance, but only mainstream sports such as football and volleyball are bringing in crowds. We talked to different athletes from Morningside College about their experiences with audience attendance.

Tessa Renze, a freshman swimmer at Morningside, is who we approached first.

Me: How does having an audience support you make you feel?

Tessa: “I get really excited” 

Me: Does it change your performance in any way?

Tessa: “it releases that side, that competitive side.”

Along with swimming, bowling is one of the least attended sports at the college. We talked to Haley Mathes, a third-year bowler and co-captain of the Mustangs team this year.

Me: What does having personal support make you feel?

Haley: “I feel like I need to try more”

Me: Do you change how you compete when people come to watch you?

Haley: “I feel like I need to showcase my talents for the people that know me”

Audiences are what propel students to become their best at the most important times.

In National news, Tuesday marked the day for country-wide elections with some different, even unexpected, outcomes.

Danica Roem, a 33-year-old former journalist, became the first openly transgender elected official Tuesday night when she ousted Robert G. Marshall from his Virgina committee spot.

Marshall, during his 13-terms, was known as Virginia’s “chief homophobe” and he introduced a “bathroom bill” that died on the floor. Roem overpowered his efforts in raising donations and made her margin of victory very clear.

Her election was one of the many included in the change from Republican holds, to Democratic committee members.

Tommy Croskrey commented that “it went from Democratic to Republican when Obama was elected, it’s just an interesting thought.”

Democrats lost around 900 seats between 2008 and 2016, but the sitting percentage is changing again, and now it is bringing the LGBTQ community with it.

Anti-Trump Democrats and Independents vied for committee spots to prove how to move past the opposition to the unpopular Republican President.

Roem was concerned with showing voters her care about local problems, and Marshall’s infatuation with mainstream conservative causes.

Sioux City also had their City Council elections Tuesday, and Morningside’s very own Alex Watters was re-elected to his seat, along with two other incumbents.

Watters will be taking his first full-time seat after being appointed a 10-month position to fill in for Keith Radig.

We asked Emma Sonier how she felt about the local elections,

“I’m okay with Alex being re-elected, but I also would have liked to see some new faces elected to City Council this year.”

Watters, Dan Moore, and Pete Groetken were all re-elected, the first time in decades three incumbents have retained their seats.

Ballots from Tuesday allowed voters to choose up to three different candidates. These three will make their office oaths in January.

This concludes your Local and National weekly news. Have a good day, this is Mari Pizzini signing out.

Article #2 w/ 3 Interviews Final

Student, peer, and family attendance of sporting events have been declining over the past five years. Audience members have been showing up to fewer games and tournaments and leaving earlier.

Athletes get thrills out of audience cheers. They perform their best when they have people to support them, whether it be their families or friends. According to the North American Journal of Psychology, Volume 13 Issue 2, “audiences or fans can impact performance” based mainly on the type of behavior they show.

Cheers, jeers, and silence can all help and hurt athletic performance.

Football, basketball, and volleyball are considered “mainstream” sports that have greater attendance than most. Tessa Renze, a freshman swimmer at Morningside College, said that swimming is less attended than many sports, and usually attended only by family.

Larger swim meets are usually attended by both parents and another family member or friend for each athlete, but many smaller meets aren’t even attended by parents.

When asked what having audience members cheer for her felt like she responded, “having them there is the best feeling. They’re supporting me. They know I can do this” and they are what push her to perform her best.

Haley Mathes, a third-year bowler at Morningside College, agreed with Renze. She said that having personal support “makes me feel like I need to try more.” Not to impress, but to make people proud.

Cassy Huiras, a freshman bowler at Morningside College, had a different outlook. She said that support “does make a difference but it isn’t always positive,” especially when spectators don’t understand the rules. Even with this outlook, she still believes that audience attendance pushes her to excel.

Renze also said that audience support helps “release a competitive side” of her swimming spirit. But these sports, bowling and swimming, are one of many competitive sports offered by colleges that don’t receive much attendance.

Without consistent audiences, these athletes have had to learn that “the audience doesn’t necessarily make the player,” as said by Renze, but that it does boost their morale.

Huiras said that “getting and having people there pushes me harder to perform my best,” but getting the audience is the difficult part.

Relaying accomplishments only goes so far. Spectators can live the moment with the player, both at the competition and after. It creates a bond and an impact. It allows players, such as Mathes, to “showcase my talents for the people that know me.”

Audiences, though they are leaving earlier and supporting less, change the way players perform.

Without an audience, a player has to find an inner reason to perform to their best ability. With an audience, a player performs for themselves and for those watching.

An audience is an integral part of sports performance for college athletes.

Article #2 w/ 3 Interviews

Student, peer, and family attendance of sporting events has been drastically declining over the past five years and does not seem to be changing anytime soon. Audience members have been showing up to fewer games and tournaments and leaving earlier.

Players on teams get thrills out of audience cheers. They perform their best when they have people to support them, whether it be their families or friends.

Football, basketball, and volleyball are considered “mainstream” sports that have a larger attendance than most. Tessa Renze, a freshman swimmer at Morningside College, said that swimming is less attended than many sports, and usually attended only by family.

When asked what having audience members cheer for her felt like she responded, “having them there is the best feeling. They’re supporting me. They know I can do this” and they are what push her.

Haley Mathes, a third-year bowler at Morningside College, agreed with Renze. She said that having personal support “makes me feel like I need to try more.” Not to impress, but to make people proud.

Cassy Huiras, a freshman bowler at Morningside College, had a different outlook saying that support “does make a difference but it isn’t always positive,” especially when spectators don’t understand the rules. Even with this outlook, she still believes that audience attendance pushes her to excel.

Renze also said that audience support helps “release a competitive side” of her swimming spirit. But these sports, bowling and swimming, are one of many competitive sports offered by colleges that don’t receive attendance.

Without consistent audiences, these athletes have had to learn that “the audience doesn’t necessarily make the player,” as said by Renze, but that it does boost their morale.

Huiras said that “getting and having people there pushes me harder to perform my best,” but getting the audience is the difficult part.

Relaying accomplishments only goes so far. Spectators can live the moment with the player, both at the competition and after. It creates a bond and an impact. It allows players, such as Mathes, to “showcase my talents for the people that know me.”

Audiences, though they are leaving earlier and supporting less, change the way players perform.

Without an audience, a player has to find an inner reason to perform to their best ability. With an audience, a player performs for themselves and for those watching.

An audience is an integral part of sports performance for college athletes.

Alex Watters: Wheeling Through Adversity

Alex Watters is a First Year Advisor at Morningside College who, in a diving accident during his Freshman year in college, lost the ability to use his hands and legs. This hasn’t stopped his mind from churning or his wheels from turning. Literally.

Watters came to our interview relaxed, excited, and seated in an electric wheelchair. Losing the use of his legs and hands has not stopped him from becoming a large member of the city council or from pursuing a political and instructional career. In fact, it fueled his want to have “the ability to make a difference” in the lives of students and people like him.

As a First Year Advisor, Watters is tasked with helping new college students ease into the challenges of college life. He offers support, guidance, and inclusion to them, but this was not always his dream.

Watters had aspirations to one day be a golf pro and even own his own golf course and restaurant, but his golf career was put on hold with his accident. After, his mind changed to his studies and now his job.

Since his accident, Watters has become wrapped in the idea of making a difference. Yes, he wants to change every student’s life, but he also wants to change and even solve the obstacles facing those who are handicapped, starting with Morningside College.

After rehabilitating from his accident, Watters returned to Morningside to continue his college education but noticed that their accessibility for those in wheelchairs was limited. His accident began to promote push buttons for doors across campus and the acceptance of other handicapped people.

Handicap accessible dorms only existed in Roadman when he returned to the school, and to this day they are still the easiest to access. Dimmitt has since added accessibility to the back, but the hills still pose major problems.

Many academic buildings on campus are older, so accommodations are needed for some classes to be placed on ground level floors. Lewis Hall and its Business, Registrar, and Admissions offices are still all inaccessible.

Buildings are still unequipped with elevators, and Lincoln Center still does not have push buttons for doors. Though Morningside has made many changes to its handicap accessibility, it still has many steps to take before being considered greatly accessible.

Though Watters does understand the extra cost it is to update systems, he is also disappointed in the steps Morningside hasn’t taken since he graduated. He said that he wants these changes “not in a selfish way, but in an inclusive way” for students like himself.

He hopes that Morningside will continue investing funds into accessibility in the future, even if he is no longer working on campus.

When asked what the future holds for him and what his goals to accomplish are he said he had no idea. He said that “goals and aspirations should adjust and change as you grow as an individual” so he expects that his goals will change.

Though he doesn’t exactly have a solid plan for the future, he does live in the idea that he is living the dream right now, literally “living the dream man.”  And that has no plans to change.

Scavenger Hunt

20170921_105658

Marcie Ponder, the secretary for the English and Modern Languages Department, was willing to give me a post-it note with a doodle drawn on it.

While in the English Department, Christina Triezenberg was willing to share the story of her academic success.

Professor Christina Triezenberg is an English Ph.D. and English and Modern Languages professor at Morningside College who has an impressive academic success story.

Triezenberg stated that she has always had a large curiosity for learning and that it continued all the way through her schooling. A Ph.D. education is plenty of work over many years, and hers was no different.

Her course towards a Ph.D. began rather late in her life. She was in her 40s when she first began to pursue her doctorate, mostly because there was no one to encourage her. There were many men in her family with Ph.D.s but no women to set an example.

She was still largely under the idea that men were able to pursue anything, but women were more tethered. She soon learned that female ambition was important and that it was acceptable to have, especially when she was finally surrounded by many female mentors.

Most of these were women who were either on the same track as Triezenberg or had crossed their own finish lines. This completely changed her view of women and higher education and she became the first woman in her family with a Ph.D.

She stated that achieving her Ph.D., even at an older age, gave her a “tremendous sense of accomplishment” that she has been able to pass to her daughter. Her Ph.D. has opened many possibilities, including her option to come teach at Morningside.

Triezenberg is originally from Detroit, Michigan but moved to Sioux City, Iowa when offered a tenure-track job in every aspect of her degree that she enjoyed.

 

Campus Nutrition: The Real Deal (Final)

College campuses across the country are notorious for their calorie-driven, starchy food content and their limp vegetables. Though most cafeterias keep their students full and fed, they often aren’t offering as many nutritional options as they should be.

According to USA Today College, many students who live and eat on campus are not even eating one serving of fruits and/or vegetables when it is recommended that they should be in taking between four-and-a-half and five servings per day.

The food that is offered to students, such as many choices of pizza and large amounts of pasta, often overshadow the smaller, less appetizing portions of fruits and vegetables.

It becomes easy in situations for students to “put healthy eating aspirations on the back burner” and forget their eating options.

As well as students being unmotivated in choosing healthy options, fresh fruits and vegetables are much more expensive to buy and provide when trying to feed a campus of thousands of hungry mouths. Many students are less inclined to pay more money for fresh foods when they could be putting the extra cash towards their tuition.

Students, especially incoming freshman, have obtained a type of food insecurity within their college campuses. Access to nutritional food is always waning, and many students report that their campus cafeterias are one of the causes of their food insecurities within the last thirty days.

College campuses are becoming more notorious for their “lack of reliable access to sufficient quantities of affordable, nutritious food,” according to The National Student Campaign Against Hunger and Homelessness. Without access to nutritional food on college campuses, most students’ educations also begin to falter. Nutritional food is a necessary ingredient in the growth of college life.

College kitchen staffs are tasked with the large responsibility of prepping and preparing meals for thousands of students between two to three times per day, including weekends and some holidays. Receiving fresh ingredients on an everyday basis in the amounts necessary to produce enough food for the entire campus is an almost impossible job within itself.

While preparing this food, these kitchen staffs are tasked with “the important responsibility of…[providing food]…in a nutritious, thoughtful manner” all at a cost that is affordable to the common college student according to the Cornell University Blog Storying the Foodshed.

While it is the choice of most college students to eat healthy foods, it also comes down to the fact that the kitchen staffs don’t have the resources to provide many healthy, appealing options. Campuses cannot provide students with fresh, healthy options daily, thus making it a struggle to eat foods high in nutritional value.

One Dead After Boat Capsizes

One female student from Armstrong Aeronautical University died early this morning after her and 3 friends were left stranded after their boat capsized.

Wapniarski and her 3 friends were attempting to swim 4 miles to shore when she cried out for help. They had been stranded in the water without lifejackets since 5 pm the night before. Randy Cohen, swimming in front of Wapniarski, swam back to help.

Wapniarski was unconscious when Cohen reached her and was pronounced dead by Daniel Perrin, another member of the group. Cohen swam with her body as long as he could.

After leaving Wapniarski, it took the three 6 more hours to reach shore. They were taken to Halifax Hospital, where Cohen is still a patient and the others were released.

No news has yet been given as to what the actual cause of death for Wapniarski was.

Plane Crash Kills Most Passengers

United Airlines Flight 553, a 61 person flight, crashed into a residential area killing most of the passengers aboard Friday afternoon.

 

42 of the 55 passengers have been found within the debris of the crash. 16 others, including the 3 flight attendants, were admitted to Holy Cross Hospital with injuries.

 

One eyewitness stated that the plane continued to descend when it was supposed to be rising. The plane’s destination was Omaha, NE, but it crashed while approaching Chicago’s Second City Airport.

 

The National Transportation Safety Board in Washington immediately dispatched an investigative team. Board Officials were already in Chicago discussing a recent commuter train crash and stated that they “will look into this thoroughly.”

Older posts