A Montanan's Outlook

Small State to Big City, Here it Is

Category: Excercises (page 1 of 2)

Reilly Mahon

Morningside College has continuously recruited and educated bright minds from throughout the world. They are drawn to the extensive nursing and biology programs, the computer science and math departments, the English, arts, and acting departments, and the Mass Communications curriculum.

Reilly Mahon, a 2015 graduate of East High in Sioux City, is one of these students that is pursuing a career in the Mass Communications field.

Originally, Mahon planned on studying to become a high school band teacher and she spent many years playing the clarinet. She soon realized that she lacked the patience that band requires.

Her younger brother spiked her interest in the communications departments with his photography. At the beginning of this semester, she decided to change her path and focus on the Mass Comm department.

With new dreams of becoming a Sports Reporter, Mahon has put her all into her studies. She believes that one of her unique qualities is her focus on school instead of social activities.

“I’ve always been this focused,” Mahon said to the question of whether her focus was new because of her new academic path. It gave her something to lean on after her parent’s divorce and it gave her a reasonable goal to achieve.

The change in departments for her major has allowed her to come out of her shell. Mahon is shy, but the Mass Communications department leaves to room for silence. She has been forced to find a voice and an opinion.

What Would You Do For a Klondike Bar?

This question rang through the bowling alley in Davenport, IA on Sunday, November 12th and across social media as I tried to find the most interesting answer to

“What would you do for a Klondike bar?”

Many people answered that they wouldn’t do anything because they were gross. Others said they would merely pay for it such as Ally Dudley, a freshman bowler from Morningside College, because what else would they do for one?

Many people were phased by the question, such as Cassy Huiras, and stated that they “would do a lot for a Klondike Bar,” but couldn’t specifically say where their devotion would stop. Haley Mathes said that she would “give up her nap” to secure a Klondike Bar.

Though there were many answers to this very simple question, they most astounding and crazy came from Senior Bowler from Iowa State Univerity, Caitlin Morris. She stated that she would sell her friend Reid’s kidney for a Klondike Bar.

Though this could seem extreme, it also shows Morris’s devotion and love for the ice cream filled cookie sandwiches.

With the idea of a $200,000 kidney on the line, the real question remains,

“What would YOU do for a Klondike Bar?”

Sioux City News

 

Hello and Good Morning, this is Mari Pizzini and I am here to give you this week’s news in both Sioux City and the United States.

Our first story focuses on the importance of college sports attendance.

According to a study done by the University of Oregon, sports audience attendance in college is on a major decline.

An audience is an integral part of sports performance, but only mainstream sports such as football and volleyball are bringing in crowds. We talked to different athletes from Morningside College about their experiences with audience attendance.

Tessa Renze, a freshman swimmer at Morningside, is who we approached first.

Me: How does having an audience support you make you feel?

Tessa: “I get really excited” 

Me: Does it change your performance in any way?

Tessa: “it releases that side, that competitive side.”

Along with swimming, bowling is one of the least attended sports at the college. We talked to Haley Mathes, a third-year bowler and co-captain of the Mustangs team this year.

Me: What does having personal support make you feel?

Haley: “I feel like I need to try more”

Me: Do you change how you compete when people come to watch you?

Haley: “I feel like I need to showcase my talents for the people that know me”

Audiences are what propel students to become their best at the most important times.

In National news, Tuesday marked the day for country-wide elections with some different, even unexpected, outcomes.

Danica Roem, a 33-year-old former journalist, became the first openly transgender elected official Tuesday night when she ousted Robert G. Marshall from his Virgina committee spot.

Marshall, during his 13-terms, was known as Virginia’s “chief homophobe” and he introduced a “bathroom bill” that died on the floor. Roem overpowered his efforts in raising donations and made her margin of victory very clear.

Her election was one of the many included in the change from Republican holds, to Democratic committee members.

Tommy Croskrey commented that “it went from Democratic to Republican when Obama was elected, it’s just an interesting thought.”

Democrats lost around 900 seats between 2008 and 2016, but the sitting percentage is changing again, and now it is bringing the LGBTQ community with it.

Anti-Trump Democrats and Independents vied for committee spots to prove how to move past the opposition to the unpopular Republican President.

Roem was concerned with showing voters her care about local problems, and Marshall’s infatuation with mainstream conservative causes.

Sioux City also had their City Council elections Tuesday, and Morningside’s very own Alex Watters was re-elected to his seat, along with two other incumbents.

Watters will be taking his first full-time seat after being appointed a 10-month position to fill in for Keith Radig.

We asked Emma Sonier how she felt about the local elections,

“I’m okay with Alex being re-elected, but I also would have liked to see some new faces elected to City Council this year.”

Watters, Dan Moore, and Pete Groetken were all re-elected, the first time in decades three incumbents have retained their seats.

Ballots from Tuesday allowed voters to choose up to three different candidates. These three will make their office oaths in January.

This concludes your Local and National weekly news. Have a good day, this is Mari Pizzini signing out.

Emma Watson Speaks about Gender Equality at One Young World

The feminist movement is “building an unstoppable current” in the world today according to Emma Watson during her speech at One Young World. The Harry Potter star and UN Messenger of Peace believes the rise of the gender equality movement is at an all-time high and is “as important as any of the other goals” that are at large.

One Young World is a UK based charity founded in 2009 dedicated to gathering the “brightest young leaders from around the world” and empowers them to make lasting changes.

This organization is about leaving behind the individual and embracing what a group can accomplish together, just as Watson was speaking about finding her tribe. She said that she found a “sisterhood; a brotherhood,” her tribe, where she could work with a group to enhance the world.

Watson’s speech was honest and emotional. She laughed before beginning her speech out of disbelief about having the ability to call herself an activist, “a word [she] never imagined that [she] would use to describe [herself].”

Watson goes on to describe the fight for gender equality as being a factor that “intersects with every single other issue we face.” Feminity and masculinity energies are within everyone and need to be “lifted up, respected” through the world.

Feminism isn’t a one time deal. Watson, quoting Bobby Kennedy, said that “each time a man or women stands up for an ideal…he sends forth a tiny ripple of hope.” These ripples cascade into currents that can fight against oppression.

Watson said that these ripples must be made by people of all ages, races, experiences, etc in order to overcome oppression. They must come from a tribe.

This tribe, activists in their own way like Watson, must consider her seven questions:

Am I willing to

be seen?

speak up?

keep going?

listen to what others have to say?

go forward even when I feel alone?

go to bed each night at peace with myself?

be my biggest, best-est, most powerful self?

These seven questions “scare the absolute shit” out of Watson herself, but they are what she sees a tribe must accomplish in order to work together for the good of all. Especially the good and installation of gender equality.

 

 

Broadcast #2: Shooting

Yesterday Laurette Brunson, 38, was shot in the abdomen by her husband Richard Brunson, 50, only three hours after their wedding.

The shooting occurred around 5 pm on Black Street. Richard Brunson used a .22-calibre handgun to shoot his wife after she threw a plate of macaroni salad at him.

The couple had been living together in the house where they were married for four or five months before the incident.

Relatives and friends said that they were surprised by the shooting. Neighbor Michael Martin said “I’ve never seen him violent. Never heard them yelling. It blows me away.”

Laurette’s three children were present during the shooting. Another neighbor, Walter Corse, was near the house during the incident.

“I heard the sound of the shot, or I think I did. It was kind of a ‘pop pop pop’ and then the son came out yelling she’s been shot and can’t breathe.”

A neighbor called the police, but Richard Brunson was gone by the time they arrived. His whereabouts are still unknown.

Mrs. Brunson is in satisfactory condition at St. Luke’s Hospital.

Broadcast #1

 

Psychology Today, June 2016

“An Element of Protection”

 

Studies have begun to show that stardust could be the ticket to Alzheimer’s research.

This stardust, more commonly known as magnesium, is essential to the body’s functions.

Scientists are finding that magnesium is more important to the body than originally thought. It is important in protecting the brain and preventing the loss of connections between nerve cells.

Scientists in the United States and China are researching the effects magnesium has on the typical disorder. It has the ability to prevent the loss of nerve connections.

In studies on both young and old animals, injections of magnesium have shown promising effects. Magnesium has the ability to rescue transmission signals.

These lost signals are what cause the traditional effect of short-term memory loss. Magnesium can potentially repair the signals between nerve cells and slow or stop memory loss.

 

Article #2 w/ 3 Interviews Final

Student, peer, and family attendance of sporting events have been declining over the past five years. Audience members have been showing up to fewer games and tournaments and leaving earlier.

Athletes get thrills out of audience cheers. They perform their best when they have people to support them, whether it be their families or friends. According to the North American Journal of Psychology, Volume 13 Issue 2, “audiences or fans can impact performance” based mainly on the type of behavior they show.

Cheers, jeers, and silence can all help and hurt athletic performance.

Football, basketball, and volleyball are considered “mainstream” sports that have greater attendance than most. Tessa Renze, a freshman swimmer at Morningside College, said that swimming is less attended than many sports, and usually attended only by family.

Larger swim meets are usually attended by both parents and another family member or friend for each athlete, but many smaller meets aren’t even attended by parents.

When asked what having audience members cheer for her felt like she responded, “having them there is the best feeling. They’re supporting me. They know I can do this” and they are what push her to perform her best.

Haley Mathes, a third-year bowler at Morningside College, agreed with Renze. She said that having personal support “makes me feel like I need to try more.” Not to impress, but to make people proud.

Cassy Huiras, a freshman bowler at Morningside College, had a different outlook. She said that support “does make a difference but it isn’t always positive,” especially when spectators don’t understand the rules. Even with this outlook, she still believes that audience attendance pushes her to excel.

Renze also said that audience support helps “release a competitive side” of her swimming spirit. But these sports, bowling and swimming, are one of many competitive sports offered by colleges that don’t receive much attendance.

Without consistent audiences, these athletes have had to learn that “the audience doesn’t necessarily make the player,” as said by Renze, but that it does boost their morale.

Huiras said that “getting and having people there pushes me harder to perform my best,” but getting the audience is the difficult part.

Relaying accomplishments only goes so far. Spectators can live the moment with the player, both at the competition and after. It creates a bond and an impact. It allows players, such as Mathes, to “showcase my talents for the people that know me.”

Audiences, though they are leaving earlier and supporting less, change the way players perform.

Without an audience, a player has to find an inner reason to perform to their best ability. With an audience, a player performs for themselves and for those watching.

An audience is an integral part of sports performance for college athletes.

Article #2 w/ 3 Interviews

Student, peer, and family attendance of sporting events has been drastically declining over the past five years and does not seem to be changing anytime soon. Audience members have been showing up to fewer games and tournaments and leaving earlier.

Players on teams get thrills out of audience cheers. They perform their best when they have people to support them, whether it be their families or friends.

Football, basketball, and volleyball are considered “mainstream” sports that have a larger attendance than most. Tessa Renze, a freshman swimmer at Morningside College, said that swimming is less attended than many sports, and usually attended only by family.

When asked what having audience members cheer for her felt like she responded, “having them there is the best feeling. They’re supporting me. They know I can do this” and they are what push her.

Haley Mathes, a third-year bowler at Morningside College, agreed with Renze. She said that having personal support “makes me feel like I need to try more.” Not to impress, but to make people proud.

Cassy Huiras, a freshman bowler at Morningside College, had a different outlook saying that support “does make a difference but it isn’t always positive,” especially when spectators don’t understand the rules. Even with this outlook, she still believes that audience attendance pushes her to excel.

Renze also said that audience support helps “release a competitive side” of her swimming spirit. But these sports, bowling and swimming, are one of many competitive sports offered by colleges that don’t receive attendance.

Without consistent audiences, these athletes have had to learn that “the audience doesn’t necessarily make the player,” as said by Renze, but that it does boost their morale.

Huiras said that “getting and having people there pushes me harder to perform my best,” but getting the audience is the difficult part.

Relaying accomplishments only goes so far. Spectators can live the moment with the player, both at the competition and after. It creates a bond and an impact. It allows players, such as Mathes, to “showcase my talents for the people that know me.”

Audiences, though they are leaving earlier and supporting less, change the way players perform.

Without an audience, a player has to find an inner reason to perform to their best ability. With an audience, a player performs for themselves and for those watching.

An audience is an integral part of sports performance for college athletes.

News Comment #7/Broadcast Comparison

CNN Video Broadcast: The lead says “literally within the last 90 seconds the National Hurricane Center hoisting hurricane watches” makes the video grasp people’s attention by making it current. The pictures and video within the broadcast or simply showing the path of the potential Gulf Coast storm Nate. They aren’t incredibly unnerving or eye-catching, but they are informative. The reporter keeps using terms like “life-threatening,” “breaking,” and “at the very least” which seems to be subjective. He is telling the storm to entertain while informing them.

 

NBC Written Story: The lead for this piece says “Tropical Storm Nate is winding up to wallop the Gulf coast this weekend,” which creates almost the same urgency that the video broadcast’s lead does. Within this story, the reporters talk about the rains, while in the video the reporter talked about the winds. This is not the same content but is about the same storm. This story also places emphasis on the states of emergency other than the potential threat the storm is making to the Gulf Coast. This source also uses many quotes that are each attributed to their sources, where the video only used the National Hurricane Center as source and attribute. Though this piece used more quotes, each source attributed their sources within their stories.

Observation Exercise

HJF Learning Center at Morningside College is frequented by students for many different reasons. Some come to study, others come to game, and more come to hang out with friends. In the back of the library is a study area that is relatively disconnected from the rest.

Maroonish couches with white detailing and chairs are arranged in a circle with medium brown stained wood tables. To the left and the right of this circle are individual study desks, light brown stain in color. Each chair matches the color of the desks with straight backs and thin, red cushions that are rough to the touch.

On the back wall, directly behind the circles, are two four-person tables of the same wood as the individual desks. The chairs are also similar, though half are missing their fabric cushions.

There was a boy sitting in one of these tables, alone. He seemed tall because his legs were a bit compressed under the table. He had curly, brown hair that reached the nape of his neck. Covering that was a black and grey ballcap.

He wore a bright red shirt with grey shorts of a flowing, thicker material. His shorts came down to just below mid-thigh, ending right above the knee. He was wearing Dockers with white socks that came up about mid-calf. He had hair covering both his shins.

His shoes were only half on, the back bent into the interior of the shoe as if he always walked with them half on. He was staring intently at his phone, though he had a MacBook open. He had a red Gatorade to his left along with a blue folder.

He had three of four papers spread in front of him and a pen next to his left arm, but he didn’t seem to be working. He occasionally smiled or laughed (a brusk tone) otherwise his face was neutral.

Loungin on the red and white couch was a girl. Her front was not in line-of-sight but she had on a bright white pullover jacket. She had dark, straight brunette hair that reached the middle of her back.

She was originally laying on the couch where only her head was visible, but a second girl approached and sat in a chair diagonally from her, causing her to sit up straight.

She had dirty blonde hair that was pulled into a high ponytail. It reached her mid-shoulder blades. She was wearing a white headband the same color as the first girl’s pullover. She was wearing a maroon Morningside Mustangs sweatshirt. Her legs were unviewable.

This second girl was drinking a drink purchased from the Spoonholder. After her entrance, the girls began discussing together quietly, and the second girl said: “oh same, she emailed you?”

During their conversation, a second boy came in and occupied one of the individual desks. He was wearing grey joggers that ended right before his ankle and white socks. He had on tan moccasins.

He was also wearing a white and grey Morningside Mustangs t-shirt and had a grey cap on backward over his dark, brunette hair.

In front of the first buy was a whiteboard with someone’s twitter handle written in blue ink. Beside that was a cartoon looking dog. Throughout the entire space, some machine in the ceiling made a rattling noise. Conversations were difficult to hear because of this.

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