Colton Irlbeck Profile (Final Draft)

December 12th, 2021 | Uncategorized | No comments

While watching the Morningside Mustangs football team play at Elwood Olsen Stadium, there is a chance fans might notice a number 46 lined up fifteen yards from the line of scrimmage on a rare Morningside punt play. This player waiting to catch the snap and punt the ball, just as he has thousands of times before, is Colton Irlbeck.

Irlbeck grew up on a farm with his parents as well as two brothers. While his father was working on the farm and mother at the local bank in Templeton, young Irlbeck and his brothers spent most of their time playing various sports with each other on their large plot of land. Irlbeck noted this time spent with his brothers in the backyard as where is love for the sport developed.

While at Kuemper Catholic High School in Templeton, IA, Irlbeck was a 4.0 GPA student and played varsity in two sports: football and soccer. Due to the two sports and lifting, Irlbeck had little free time, but mentioned, “Between school and sports my time at Kuemper seems like a blur, but I always really enjoyed going to the lake with my friends whenever we had the chance.”

Once he graduated from high school, Irlbeck had a tough choice on his hands. He faced a choice between attending Iowa State University or the then Morningside College. Irlbeck said, “I had trouble picking, but once coach Ryan offered me a scholarship the choice was simple. I wanted to play football and Morningside gave me the chance to do it.” Irlbeck added, “Now, I have no regrets about my choice.”

On the field, Irlbeck is a two-year starter and one of the top ranked punters in the NAIA. In fact, Morningside long snapper Jacob Murphy exclaimed, “There is no other punter I’d rather have, Irlbeck has a unique mix of size and strength that is rare to see in a punter.”

Off the field, he is an accounting and finance major in his senior year. In his rare off time, Irlbeck looks to hanging out with his friends, Irlbeck joked, “Since you spend so much time with your teammates, they easily become some of your closest friends, so I look forward to hanging out with them.” Irlbeck is also an avid golfer when Iowa weather allows it.

Irlbeck reminisced about a blowout game against the Jamestown Jimmies where he had yet to play a snap in the game, so coach Ryan allowed him to take a rep at wide receiver. “I didn’t get the ball thrown to me or anything, but I like to think that I did pretty good blocking the corner.” Irlbeck recalled with a slick grin. Whether through his doing or not, the corner Irlbeck was blocking ended the play on the ground with Irlbeck standing over him, which caused an eruption of excitement from the Morningside sideline. Fellow Morningside kicker/punter Ben Steffens states, “I don’t care what Colton says, he pancaked that corner and there is no arguing it.”

After Morningside, Irlbeck hopes to become a financial adviser and possibly even own a financial planning office. Irlbeck mentioned multiple internships he has had through Morningside exclaiming, “I’m thankful for internships I’ve been able to do because they showed me what I like and possibly saved me from things I don’t.” Seeing his two brothers start their families has shown Irlbeck how excited he is to start a family.

“I feel like I’ve had a pretty basic journey here at Morningside.” this underexaggerated statement from Irlbeck shows that no matter what he accomplishes, he will always be a humble farm boy from Templeton, Iowa. 

Irlbeck Profile (Draft)

December 6th, 2021 | Uncategorized | No comments

While watching the Morningside Mustangs football team play at Elwood Olsen Stadium, there is a chance you might notice a number 46 lined up fifteen yards from the line of scrimmage on a rare Morningside punt play. This player waiting to catch the snap and punt the ball, just as he had thousands of times before, is Colton Irlbeck.

Irlbeck was born on May 12th, 1999, in the small town of Carrol, Iowa. Though, Irlbeck lived in the even smaller town of Templeton, Iowa, a tight knit community of about 350 people.

Irlbeck grew up on a farm with his parents as well as two brothers. While his father was working on the farm and mother at the local bank in Templeton, young Irlbeck and his brothers spent most of their time playing various sports with each other on their large plot of land.

Along with sports, religion played a large roll in Irlbeck’s life. Going to a Catholic church service twice a week and attending a Catholic High School, Irlbeck noted, “I enjoyed it, it was a great way to be connected with my family and friends in the community.”

While at Kuemper Catholic High School, Irlbeck was a 4.0 GPA student and played varsity in two sports: football and soccer. Due to the two sports and lifting, Irlbeck had little free time, but mentioned, “Between school and sports my time at Kuemper seems like a blur, but I always really enjoyed going to the lake with my friends whenever we had the chance.”

Once he graduated from high school, Irlbeck had a tough choice on his hands. He faced a choice between attending Iowa State University or the then Morningside College. Irlbeck said, “I had trouble picking, but once coach Ryan offered me a scholarship the choice was simple. I wanted to play football and Morningside gave me the chance to do it.” Irlbeck added, “Now, I have no regrets about my choice.”

On the field, Irlbeck is a two-year starter and one of the top ranked punters in the NAIA. Off the field, he is an accounting and finance major in his senior year. In his continually rare off time, Irlbeck looks to hanging out with his friends, Irlbeck joked, “Since you spend so much time with your teammates, they easily become some of your closest friends, so I look forward to hanging out with them.” Irlbeck is also an avid golfer when Iowa weather allows it.

After Morningside, Irlbeck hopes to become a financial adviser and possibly even own a financial planning office. Irlbeck mentioned multiple internships he has had through Morningside exclaiming, “I’m thankful for internships I’ve been able to do because they showed me what I like and possibly saved me from things I don’t.” Seeing his two brothers start their families has shown Irlbeck how excited he is to start a family.

“I feel like I’ve had a pretty basic journey here at Morningside.” this underexaggerated statement from Irlbeck shows that no matter what he accomplishes, he will always be a humble farm boy from Templeton, Iowa. 

News Comment Week 15

December 2nd, 2021 | Uncategorized | 1 comment

The article I found this week is about the Seattle Seahawks signing veteran running back Adrian Peterson. Seattle is hoping the 36 year old running back is going to bring a spark to their beat up backfield. Peterson only spent minimal time on the free agent market after being waived by the Tennessee Titans only one week ago. Though Peterson has not been elevated to the 57 man roster yet, head coach Pete Carrol is excited about the signing.

I personally like the lead of this story, it was simple and to the point. Though I might change one or two things about the wording, it was a good lead. As for the organization, the story first talks about Peterson’s recent career, then goes on to sample the Seahawk’s running back woes. I personally think these two topics would make more sense if they were flipped. First talk about the reasons why Seattle took a chance on Peterson, then talk about what Peterson had done prior to this season. Since that order of importance comes down to opinion, I think the story was overall well written and interesting.

https://www.espn.com/nfl/story/_/id/32764964/seattle-seahawks-sign-veteran-adrian-peterson-practice-squad

The Argumentative Payton Miller

November 21st, 2021 | Uncategorized | 1 comment

When given a list of descriptive words, Payton Miller scanned her way through the list and decide “argumentative” was the best word to describe her.

Miller says that she enjoys hearing other peoples’ opinion on a variety of subjects and then promptly arguing for the other side.

“When people argue their side, they either show their ignorance or teach me something new” said Miller. Since she is a moderate, Miller does not overly agree with either side of most common arguments so she is able to argue, or learn, about both sides of the argument.

Though she does it often, Miller noted that she does not really get anything out of arguing other than a little entertainment or the occasional gain of knowledge.

It is easy to see Miller sampling this trait of hers by examining her behavior in any of her various classes; especially if she is talking to one Caleb Lubbers, whom Miller mentioned she enjoys giving a hard time to.

News Comment Week 13

November 17th, 2021 | Uncategorized | 1 comment

For this week’s news comment, I picked an article about the NFL ramping up covid protocols. These strict protocols are due to the upcoming holiday season. Between November 26th and December 1st, vaccinated players will have to have weekly negative covid tests while unvaccinated players will be required to have a daily negative covid test to enter facilities. Also, effective November 29th the NFL will require team cafeterias and weight-rooms in order to ensure all players are wearing masks.

The lead for this story is insanely long for a lead and is one run-on sentence that could have easily been split up or shortened into a better lead. I believe the best way would have been to make a whole different lead and use the lead as the first paragraph. As for the rest of the story, I think it was well organized and used the inverted pyramid style of writing well. One interesting thing I have noticed is that all ESPN articles have a similar set up: a long lead, most important information, a quote, and then closing or future information.

https://www.espn.com/nfl/story/_/id/32653852/nfl-intensify-covid-19-protocols-thanksgiving-holiday

News Comment Week 12

November 10th, 2021 | Uncategorized | 2 comments

The article I read was about the NFL backing their officials on the subject of a highly controversial taunting call against the Chicago Bears. It broke down the implications of the penalty on the outcome of the game and the reasons the flag was thrown. Tony Correnet and his officiating crew cited the “posture” the Bears player made towards the stealers bench as their reasoning for the penalty.

Though I think the lead was affective, it definitely could have been cut down to a more simple statement and still gotten the point across. It was overly specific with information that could have been used in later paragraphs. Past the lead, I thought the story was well organized. It had a good inverted pyramid giving details on what happened first, then moving on to the implications. Finally, it finished with past information about the season. I enjoyed the last sentence of story which talked about the ridiculous number of taunting fouls called this season.

https://www.espn.com/nfl/story/_/id/32599425/nfl-stands-controversial-taunting-call-bears-steelers-game-mnf

  1. How the outcome of the game could have changed without the penalty.
  2. What causes the officials to throw a penalty flag in today’s NFL.
  3. What made the NFL decide to crack down on taunting.