Poetry Submissions

Submit up to five (5) poems through our Google Form linked below. But first, please read and follow our submission guidelines:

We read and select anonymously, so please do not include your name anywhere in the file.

Poetry should be single-spaced in 12-point Times New Roman font.

Please do not submit any more than five (5) poems.

Please submit each piece as its own Google Doc or Microsoft Word file and title the file as follows:
Poetry – Title.
Example: Poetry – Song of Myself.

You are encouraged to submit in multiple genres (i.e. fiction, creative nonfiction, visual art).

Click here to submit your poems now!

If you have any questions, please contact Kiosk faculty sponsor Dr. Leslie Werden (werden@morningside.edu).

Letters from the Editors

            To me, the most inspiring aspect of Kiosk has always been its legacy. Established in 1938 under the title Manuscript, this publication has been collecting high caliber literature for eighty-one years. I still remember the wonder, the weight of history that settled over me when I first read Virginia Bailey’s unsettling, surrealist short story “The Merry-Go-Round” in Kiosk vol. 19 (then-titled Perspectives). Fifty nine years after it was published, I fell in love with her work; even though I know nothing about her, and likely never will, I held in my hands a representation of her thoughts and feelings from 1960. At the prodigious age that Kiosk has attained, we have become more than a literary and arts publication; we are, in a sense, a historical document. In another eighty-one years, God willing, other readers will pull Kiosk 2019 from the archives and experience that same wonder and awe.
            For that reason, as editor-in-chief, I have been acutely aware of Kiosk as a reflection of our year in history. We exist in a time of fear and anxiety. This is perhaps a trite statement, echoed many times by the generations before us; nevertheless, we do live in an increasingly complicated world. No matter what creed a person espouses, recent events such as the grim report on climate change, the Presidency of Donald Trump, and mass gun violence have caused unrest and disagreement in our nation. Accordingly, “Depression and Other Mental Disorders” (World Health Organization, 2017) reports a 18.4% increase in depression between 2005 and 2015. In light of this, one might expect the art produced in this time of uncertainty to reflect fear and anxiety as well.
            However, this has not proved true. With few exceptions, the pieces submitted to the 2019 Kiosk fell into two categories: works of fantasy and intimate, loving snapshots of everyday life. The pages of this year’s publication burst with odes to small things: social media, a coffee mug, a butterfly—seemingly insignificant moments which echo beyond the limits of their minutiae.
            In this issue, in this year, in this moment in time, the excellent literature of Kiosk 2019 asks us a question: is embracing fantasy a restorative coping mechanism, or is it an irresponsible escape from reality? Our opening piece, “Refugee Child,” asks this question quite loudly; the rest of the selections speak in response. We hope that the many viewpoints we have published this year will be enlightening as well as entertaining.
            Finally, Kiosk continues to be, as it always has been, an everchanging entity. Under the leadership of Digital Editor Ally Hecht, 2019 sees the advent of Kiosk’s first-ever website, introducing us to the twenty-first century. We hope this will make the literary talent and the vibrant, unique voices of the Morningside community even more accessible to the broader world. We encourage you to visit us at morningside.edu/kiosk, and to carry these conversations with you as you go.
            I cannot offer enough thanks to Tatum Skaff, John Kolbo, Terri McGaffin, Courtney Klocke, Niccole Wolken, and Abby Koch for their work on the magazine. The Associate Editors, Evelyn, Lindsey, and Mari, worked tirelessly this year with increased responsibilities from previous Editors; as Digital Editor, Ally pioneered a new position for Kiosk and established it with excellence. Without them, this magazine would not exist. Kim Sangwin deserves the utmost gratitude for the countless hours I spent fiddling on the website with her; it wasn’t her job, but she went above and beyond the call of duty in the effort of helping us. Thank you to President Reynders, Bill Deeds, and Morningside College for their continued support.
            Finally, thank you to Dr. Coyne for thirty years of service on this magazine. You will be greatly missed.


Amy Jackson


            When the three of us were figuring out the ropes of Kiosk, we created a group chat called the “Kiosk Krazies.” All of us laughed and joked about how much of the Kiosk would drive us crazy. But I think that it takes a certain amount of crazy to help make the Kiosk happen. It is the good kind of crazy that helps decide what amazing literature and art will be presented and how they will be organized. It is the crazy inside every contributor and editor of Kiosk that opens us to new learning experiences and new challenges.
            Being one of the three visual editors for the Kiosk was a crazy experience for each of us, as we arranged the artwork and literature, learned how to create large mock-ups, and strived to improve Kiosk visually. We learned about the amount of teamwork and communication that it takes to bring another successful issue of Kiosk to campus.
            Of course, Kiosk would not be possible without all the amazing artists and authors submitting their work. A big thank-you goes to everyone who took the time to create all the wonderful submissions. We encourage you to never stop being creative and to never stop thinking outside of the box. We hope that your creativity will be shared again by submitting to Kiosk next year. Thank you to Amy Jackson and her dedication and love of Kiosk. A huge thank you goes to John Kolbo for his wisdom, dedication, and fueling our veins with coffee. Kiosk would not be successful without him and his positive attitude.
            Editing Kiosk taught every person on board something new. All three of us have become better designers for it. Our year with Kiosk took three crazy designers to put together this issue, but we believe that it will be one of the most memorable. We are honored to be a part of this prestigious publication and are proud to present the 2019 Kiosk.


Abby Koch, Niccole Wolken, Courtney Klocke

Art Gallery

WWRD
Abby Koch // illustration

Abby Koch is a graphic design and mass communication major from Sioux City, IA. When she isn’t designing or in the campus radio station, she’s enjoying long walks in the frozen food aisle.



Imagine Dragon Album Cover
Kaitlynn McShane // graphic design


Kaitlynn McShane is a senior from Bennington, Nebraska, majoring in Graphic Design and Advertising. She loves Harry Potter, painting, and golfing in her free time.




First Year Adults Brochure
Elliott Conover // graphic design

Elliott Conover is a Graphic Design Major at Morningside College with an emphasis in both Marketing and Advertising. In his four years at Morningside, he has met some amazing people that have lead him on the path he is on today. The experiences and memories he has made will never be forgotten.



I’d Like to Buy a Vowel
Ben Hieb // graphic design

Ben Hieb is from Mitchell, SD, where he attended high school. He started his college career in 2017 here at Morningside. He majors in graphic design and photography.



Blue Beauty
Ashlee Brus // photography


Ashlee Brus is a freshman at Morningside majoring in Photography. She has a passion for photography and hopes to own her own photo studio after college.





Pace
Tracie Tuttle // painting


Tracie Tuttle is a junior majoring in Studio Art and minoring in Graphic Design and Journalism. She is involved with Art Club and writing for the Collegian Reporter. She enjoys both the process of creating art but the satisfaction of seeing the final result.




Chinese Little Town
Angela Chen // painting


Wanying (Angela) Chen is a Chinese girl studying animation and video game development at Morningside College. She loves painting, crafts, skateboarding, and basketball.





Type Buffalo
Abby Koch // graphic design

Abby Koch is a graphic design and mass communication major from Sioux City, IA. When she isn’t designing or in the campus radio station, she’s enjoying long walks in the frozen food aisle.



Performance Plus
Elliott Conover // digital


Elliott Conover is a Graphic Design Major at Morningside College with an emphasis in both Marketing and Advertising. In his four years at Morningside, he has met some amazing people that have lead him on the path he is on today. The experiences and memories he has made will
never be forgotten.



Be Awesome
Kaitlynn McShane // illustration


Kaitlynn McShane is a senior from Bennington, Nebraska, majoring in Graphic Design and Advertising. She loves Harry Potter, painting, and golfing in her free time.



Lift Magazine Cover
Abby Koch // digital


Abby Koch is a graphic design and mass communication major from Sioux City, IA. When she isn’t designing or in the campus radio station, she’s enjoying long walks in the frozen food aisle.



Life Love
Kaitlynn McShane // illustration
Bloom
Kaitlynn McShane // illustration


Kaitlynn McShane is a senior from Bennington, Nebraska, majoring in Graphic Design and Advertising. She loves Harry Potter, painting, and golfing in her free time.





Butterfly
Anna Uehling // photography


Anna Uehling is a sophomore at Morningside College. She is majoring in advertising and graphic design. Growing up in Minnesota, Anna was surrounded by nature, fishing and camping. This love of nature is the inspiration for much of Anna’s art.