Calissa Writes

I see, but do I perceive?

Author: Calissa (page 1 of 3)

The ‘epidemic’ of violence against trans women of color

https://abcnews.go.com/US/trans-women-color-facing-epidemic-violence-day-fight/story?id=66015811&cid=clicksource_4380645_null_card_related

Ignacio Torres, Jessica Hopper, and Juju Chang write about the growing epidemic against trans women for Transgender Day of Remembrance. The story focuses on trans women of color. The article opens with the story of Muhlaysia Booker, a trans woman of color from Dallas. Her visibility lead to her being attacked in April. Only weeks after speaking out about violence that faces the transgender community, Booker was shot to death. She became the 22nd transgender individual to be killed in 2019. In October, the American Medical Association called the murder of transgender people an “epidemic.” While transgender stories are more visible, the article dives into different individuals and groups supporting the community.

The story is very well organized. The transition to the next section is either a related link or a picture, but it doesn’t interrupt the main idea. The short paragraphs allow for good flow and allow some sentences to stand out. The sentence “But Booker never saw justice.” is isolated. The ebb and flow allow the more emotional parts of these women’s struggles feel closer. They are written like people. The article is a follow-up profile. It puts names and faces into the inhumane killings of these transgender women. The story also presents how they won’t give up, another short sentence being isolated. The small bit of hope in “’But I cannot stop living,’ she added.” is a breather in the story.

Amanda / Description

Amanda and a few others loiter in the Eppley lobby. She and I talk as if we still see each other everyday. Her curly hair is tied back in a braid, the blonde only a few shades darker than her pale skin. Amanda stands a little taller than me, but at my 4′ 11″ that isn’t much of a feat. She’s wearing straight-leg jeans and a black pullover. She’s small but stocky, an obvious strength in her posture. Her voice is low. It sits in her mouth for a moment before she speaks.

She’s a senior in high school, and her lamentations about her terminal senioritis are all you would need to hear to know that. Her face is round, but expressive. She smiles as she praises the artists from the evening, Presidio, a brass group. Amanda, who plays the trumpet, practically fawns over the trumpet playing that night.

Flooding in Venice

https://abcnews.go.com/International/venice-flooded-highest-tide-50-years/story?id=66968754&cid=clicksource_4380645_null_card_image

 Phoebe Natanson describes the historic flooding happening in Venice. The city is experiencing record high flooding of 187 centimeters, which is about 6 feet of water. Natanson sprinkles the article with picture of flooding, from a tourist pushing her suitcase through water to the flood in Gritti Palace. The water receded about 43 centimeters this morning, leaving the Venetians in about 144 centimeters of flooding. Sea-water damage to buildings and works of art wrecks preservation. Mayor Luigi Brugnaro believes climate change is the source of the flooding. He asked the government to declare “a state of emergency. While flooding is not new to the city, a project to use floating gates to prevent flooding has been delayed since 2003.

This article thrives on imagery. The pictures that break up the story all have different feelings. Natanson has imagery in her writing as well. She does a good job molding a frame of devastation, not just of the people but of the pieces of the city itself. The pictures do another job of splitting the story from the current flooding to some of the history. It is one of the first stories I’ve read that uses pictures well. Natanson also does a good job in ordering the article. She begins with the flooding, does some history in the middle, and ends with what is happening now.

Article 3: Never Again News

Hello and welcome to Never Again News. I’m your host C3 and here are today’s top stories.

As November swiftly passes, many students may be counting the days to Thanksgiving break. However, Thanksgiving marks not only the closing of the first semester, but also the end of the “red zone”: when risk of sexual assault on a college campus is the highest. 

According to USAtoday, half of college sexual assaults occur between the beginning of the school year and November.

College women from ages 18 to 24 are three times more like to experience sexual violence.

So, as November begins, do the women on Morningside’s campus feel safe?

Jolene Horn said: “I feel safe walking around campus, but I know I have teammates and friends who are not safe because of suspicious vehicles or just the conditions of the sidewalks and stuff like that.”

Marissa Herll, added: “No, I don’t feel safe on campus at all. It’s dim lit and there’s been lots of break-ins and creepy things happening around campus.”

If you witness something suspicious or don’t feel safe, call Campus Security at 712-274-5234.

Our second story today highlights how a little goes a long way when it comes to respecting another person’s identity.

Using someone’s correct pronouns is a simple way to show respect. Yet, when it comes to the acceptance of singular “they”, people tend to express doubt.

Often, gripes about the use of they/them pronouns are rooted in grammar. However, according to the Merriam-Webster dictionary, one definition of “they” is, “Used to refer to a single person whose gender identity is nonbinary.”

Here on Morningside’s campus, you can visit the student group, Gender Undone. The group discusses gender identity along with other topics.  

Dr. Valerie Hennings, faculty advisor for the group, says when referring to another person: “What’s important is trying to be respectful of using the pronouns an individual requests, simply because it’s who they are. The name and the pronouns that we use, that’s something that we should be able to determine.”

So, if you find yourself questioning someone’s identity, ask yourself: Are your feelings of being “correct” more important than respect?

Finally, with the winter season approaching fast, so is the festive concert Christmas at Morningside.

With a pinnacle concert looming closer, it begs the questions: how does music impact Morningside’s students?

Kelsey Toomey, a sophomore, describes music as: “It allows me to make a lot of new friends and it provides a space in time away from my classes, where I have to actually think about what I’m doing, where music I can just…be and it’s nice to just be sometimes.”

Josie Meads, another sophomore, provides a different angle: “I think some days it’s enjoyable, and other days it makes me stress out because I have to memorize a lot of stuff and I don’t have time for it.”

Music can reduce stress while also adding to it. It’s an individual experience. So, whether you’re participating in music or just popping headphones in, music is resounding part of student life at Morningside College.  

I’m C3 and this is Never Again. Tune in after the break to hear a breathtaking story about crabs running mazes. But, for now I leave you, with the weather.

https://www.usatoday.com/story/news/education/2019/08/26/rape-college-back-to-school-sexual-assault-safety/1930485001/

https://www.theguardian.com/science/2019/aug/05/he-she-or-gender-neutral-pronouns-reduce-biases-study

Anna Uehling: Animal Lover Extraordinaire 2

Looking at the outside of the Morningside Garretson House, you may think Anna Uehling and her four roommates are the only occupants. However, her own room is home to more aquatic animals than people in the house.

Seven beta fish and two goldfish swim happily in Uehling’s room. “My desk is literally covered in fish,” Uehling said with a laugh. The nine fishy friends that make their residence on Uehling’s desk are only the beginning of Uehling’s animal love.

Uehling described herself as “cat crazy.” Her 24-pound Maine coon cat is round, fluffy, and walkable. Uehling has a leash for her cat and has the arm muscles to pick him up too.

However, she has taken care of other cats before. Over the summer, she was fostering cats out of her love for the animal and her wish to find them good homes.

Not only does Uehling express her love for cats through her actions, but on her body as well. She has two cat tattoos. One is of her current cat and the other is of her first cat who passed away.

Uehling is very dedicated to her love of animals and brings that to her life at Morningside. It’s a love she is not ashamed of through her permanent ink and happy expressions.

Article 3 draft

As November swiftly passes, many students may be counting the days to Thanksgiving break. However, Thanksgiving marks not only the closing semester, but also the end of the “red zone”: when risk of sexual assault on a college campus is the highest. 

According to USAtoday, half of college sexual assaults take place between the beginning of the school year to November.

College women from age to 18 to 24 are three times more like to experience sexual violence.

So, as November begins, do the women on Morningside College’s campus feel safe?

(ADD A HUMAN SOURCE YOU BUFFOON)

A little goes a long way when it comes to respecting another person’s identity.

Using someone’s correct pronouns is a simple way to show respect. Yet, when it comes to the acceptance of singular “they”, people tend to express doubt.

Often, gripes about the use of they/them pronouns are rooted in grammar. However, according to the Merriam-Webster dictionary, one definition of “they” is, “Used to refer to a single person whose gender identity is nonbinary.”

Another misconception about they/them pronouns is that they are a new trend.

They/them pronouns can’t be dismissed with a simple “kids these days.” According to the Guardian, the oldest use of singular “they” appears in 1375.

Above all, the most important thing is respect. Psychologist Brenda Crawford said, “It is an easy way to show respect to an individual by using their chosen name [and] their chosen pronouns. It takes hardly an effort to do that.”

So, if you find yourself questioning someone’s identity, ask yourself: Are your feelings of being “correct” more important than respect?

Today’s Science Snippet finds maze running lab rats may have some crabby competition. Researchers in Swansea, Wales have been testing shore crab’s ability to navigate mazes.

According to an article in the New York Times, shore crabs can learn how to finish mazes and remember the route without any assistance from the researchers.

The study, published in Biology Letters, found the crabs can remember the maze for about two weeks.

Researchers hope to use this discovery to see how the environment impacts crab behavior by building mazes in water that mimic future ocean conditions.

(ADD A HUMAN SOURCE YOU BUFFOON)

The maze running crabs were returned to the ocean after the study.

Acid attack

https://abcnews.go.com/US/milwaukee-man-charged-hate-crime-racist-acid-attack/story?id=66802152&cid=clicksource_4380645_null_card_image

Karma Allen describes the attack on a Hispanic man with battery acid. The incident, which happened on Friday involved Clifton Blackwell, a 61-year-old Milwaukee man charged with a hate crime on Wednesday, and 42-year-old Mahud Villalaz. According to Villalz, Blackwell threw the acid at his face after confronting him about his status as a citizen. Villalaz told Blackwell he was a US citizen before telling Blackwell how most people came from somewhere else. Villalaz had begun to walk away when he was splashed with the liquid. Available surveillance footage of the encounter shows Blackwell splashing Villalaz with the acid. Blackwell was also charged with first degree reckless injury and use of a dangerous weapon. He could face 25 years in prison.

The author does a good job of staying objective. Allen creates a good inverted pyramid, opening with the charges that they mentioned in the title before moving to the story of how the attack went down. The lead tells that Blackwell is a Milwaukee man but that seems like useless information. Since they don’t list where the attack took place, knowing where the attacker is from doesn’t seem relevant. The placement of the pictures is a little off kilter as well. Blackwell’s mugshot is under the description of Villalaz’s recount of the attack. I feel like it would flow better if it was underneath the paragraph before, which is about Blackwell. I wish the author would have provide a small warning about the picture of Villalaz. The picture is not terribly graphic, but it could be triggering to anyone who has experienced anything similar.

Couple Shooting

One woman is in the hospital only hours after her own wedding.

Laurette Kenny Brunson was shot by her was husband, Richard Brunson, yesterday. The couple was married only 3 hours before the shooting occurred.

According to police spokesperson Sergeant Mann: “The shooting occurred at 5 p.m. It happened because she threw a plate of wedding reception macaroni salad at him.”

Richard and Laurette Brunson had lived together for four to five months. The bride had three children in the house at the time of the incident.

Walter Corse, a neighbor, said “I heard the sound of the shot. And then the son came out yelling ‘she’s been shot and can’t breathe.’”

Laurette Brunson is now recovering at St. Luke’s Hospital. Richard Brunson’s whereabouts are still unknown. If you or anyone you know has any information, contact the Sioux City Police department.

Tackle football ban tackled in New York as brain injury research grows

https://abcnews.go.com/Health/evidence-brain-injuries-mounts-ny-considers-ban-youth/story?id=66635225&cid=clicksource_4380645_null_sq_hed

New York is considering a ban on tackle football for children 12 and younger. The article by Erin Shumaker summarizes how New York may implement a law based on legislation from 2017. Bronx Assemblyman Michael Benedetto did not gain much support when he first introduced the legislation. Now, two years later, the growing awareness and research into concussions has given the bill more support. A hearing on tackle football was held on Tuesday. There was testimony from several doctors, coaches, researchers and ex-football players. Shumaker moves to the research behind the idea for the ban. The National Football League doubts the research saying there are many questions about head trauma.

The article is framed around the research about grown football players. The article is short, which makes it get to the research quick. There is nice separation between the legislation paragraphs and the research with a picture. Despite the title suggesting more about youth football, Shumaker does not seem to be writing for parents whose children may be affected. All of the brain injury research is about chronic traumatic encephalopathy, which is only identified after death. I believe it would have been stronger to frame it around how a child’s development may be impacted by head trauma. Perhaps mentioning research from both would make the article live up to the title it’s been given.

Science Story: Read by Jerrie Hanson

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