Matt O'Connnell Blog

Located at Morningside College

Month: December 2019

Article 4 Final Reupload

Growing up Logan English never had it easy. Since he was young, he spent a large amount of time in the hospital. Showing symptoms like uncontrollable shakes, sudden jerking movements, and loosing consciousness He wasn’t aware then, but Logan was showing signs of developing epilepsy.

Logan remembers how concerned his parents were when he first started developing symptoms. “I started having issues when I was around 6 or 7. I just remember one day my arms felt heavy. At the time, I didn’t think much of it. But later that night I had a sudden pain all over my body. It kind of feels like a charlie horse on your leg, just much more painful and longer-lasting. I remember trying to yell for my parents but for some reason I couldn’t. After what felt like hours the pain subsided.”

After alerting his parents they immediately went to St. Lukes Hospital. Arriving in the emergency room, they instantly were checked in and seen by an E.R. doctor. While describing his symptoms, the doctor ordered an electroencephalogram, more commonly known as an EEG.

Logan’s mother Stacy remembers the fear that she felt waiting in the hospital room. “I remember just waiting for Logan to get back from his tests. I still think it was one of the most difficult times of my life.” After her son came back from his tests she recalls the nerve-racking wait that came next. “To this day, I remember waiting for what felt like hours in that room. Finally, a group of 4 or 5 doctors came in to tell us Logan was diagnosed with epilepsy.”

His treatment plan included starting some medication to combat his condition. “We had a follow-up appointment a couple of days after the hospital visit. They wanted me to start on medication right away. But first, there are several tests you have to do before they prescribe you epileptic medicine. First I had to have a blood test to check to see if my body would be able to handle a more aggressive drug. Second I had to keep a diary of what I was feeling for the first month I was taking the medicine. This was crucial because while on my original drug I felt very tired all of the time. They ended up giving me a different drug that I still take to this day.”

Since this incident, Logan has only had a few minor problems. ” I still have a few side effects from this medication. But it is the best option that I have. Later on if my condition gets worse I can have surgery. The surgery that we have discussed before is called vagus nerve stimulation. They would put a small computer in my chest that would regulate my nervous system more efficiently. Unfortunately the surgery is very expensive even with insurance so at the moment it seems unlikely I will go through with it. Especially with a one year old boy and another child on the way.”

The drive and determination that Logan has should be a motivation to everyone. His life has certainly had its ups and downs. But he hopes to start a new chapter in his life while starting a family.

NBA coach’s challenge off to a rocky start

via https://www.espn.com/nba/story/_/id/28218555/nba-coach-challenge-rocky-start

Before the 2019-2020 NBA season, the league’s general managers voted to adopt the coach’s challenge. This new rule allows for one challenge per game, regardless of the outcome. Since November 30th, there have been 174 challenges and 75 resulted in overturned calls. Currently the success rate for challenges is only 43 percent.

Recently, after Boston Celtics coach Brad Stevens commented on the rule after a failed challenge. “I’m done with these f-kn challenges” “This is unbelievable.” In response, Montey McCutchen the NBA vice president of referee and development had this to say “We’re very pleased with how a very difficult concept and rule has been implemented.”

The Rockets and Spurs played December 4th and the challenge rule was brought into play. Mike D’antoni challenged a call on the court. A strange dunk by Rockets star James Harden was not ruled a basket. Later officials admitted that they made a mistake. The Rockets are expected to protest the decision.

The article was written by Tim Bontemps and Brian Windhorst. Both have been journalists for years and are well respected. There is also a video segment from ESPN’s First Take. They both agree that the blown basket doesn’t matter. They still crumbled defensively late game. Which gave them the game in the 4th quarter.

Mega City Mall Story

An explosion occurred at Mega City Mall at 9:50 today. Police are still at the scene. We have several eyewitness reports. First, a local hospital nurse who was shoping for her son at the time had this to say. “Everything was like a Michale Bay movie. There were body parts everywhere . I was shopping for my son. He really wanted a turbo time action figure.” The local mall Santa commented on the explosion. “I was on a smoke break when I heard such a clatter, and all through the mall there was blood splattered. My reindeer were in the shop.”

Mega City police captain Ross Fuglsang commented on the explosion. “We are still working on clearing the site. We received no prior warning or threats of the explosion. We are working closely with Mega City mall management to ensure that the investigation is thorough and timely. We are in the process of viewing and analyzing CCTV footage in the mall.”

The Mega City mall released a statement earlier today. “Our sympathy goes out to all the families impacted by today’s events. We will work closely with authorities to find the answers and insure that MCM remains a safe place for our customers and associates.”

Zoo News Release

Unfortunately, the Midland Zoo has lost several friends. Homer the polar bear has passed away. Currently, the other two polar bears Yukon and Mckenzie are being monitored by our veterinary staff. Zookeeper Sara N.Getty had this to say about Homer’s passing, “Homer was a very curious and playful polar bear and we will miss him terribly.”

Regina, the bobcat died of renal failure last week. She was 10 years old. Kenya the giraffe accidentally in a freak accident. Zoo director Chris P. Bacon commented on the recent deaths. “We will do everything in our power to determine how this bear died. Animal welfare and the preservation of species are our primary goals here at the zoo.

Article 4 Final

Image may contain: 3 people, including Logan English, people smiling

Growing up Logan English never had it easy. Since he was young, he spent a large amount of time in the hospital. Showing symptoms like uncontrollable shakes, sudden jerking movements, and loosing consciousness He wasn’t aware then, but Logan was showing signs of developing epilepsy.

Logan remembers how concerned his parents were when he first started developing symptoms. “I started having issues when I was around 6 or 7. I just remember one day my arms felt heavy. At the time, I didn’t think much of it. But later that night I had a sudden pain all over my body. It kind of feels like a charlie horse on your leg, just much more painful and longer-lasting. I remember trying to yell for my parents but for some reason I couldn’t. After what felt like hours the pain subsided.”

After alerting his parents they immediately went to St. Lukes Hospital. Arriving in the emergency room, they instantly were checked in and seen by an E.R. doctor. While describing his symptoms, the doctor ordered an electroencephalogram, more commonly known as an EEG.

Logan’s mother Stacy remembers the fear that she felt waiting in the hospital room. “I remember just waiting for Logan to get back from his tests. I still think it was one of the most difficult times of my life.” After her son came back from his tests she recalls the nerve-racking wait that came next. “To this day, I remember waiting for what felt like hours in that room. Finally, a group of 4 or 5 doctors came in to tell us Logan was diagnosed with epilepsy.”

His treatment plan included starting some medication to combat his condition. “We had a follow-up appointment a couple of days after the hospital visit. They wanted me to start on medication right away. But first, there are several tests you have to do before they prescribe you epileptic medicine. First I had to have a blood test to check to see if my body would be able to handle a more aggressive drug. Second I had to keep a diary of what I was feeling for the first month I was taking the medicine. This was crucial because while on my original drug I felt very tired all of the time. They ended up giving me a different drug that I still take to this day.”

Since this incident, Logan has only had a few minor problems. ” I still have a few side effects from this medication. But it is the best option that I have. Later on if my condition gets worse I can have surgery. The surgery that we have discussed before is called vagus nerve stimulation. They would put a small computer in my chest that would regulate my nervous system more efficiently. Unfortunately the surgery is very expensive even with insurance so at the moment it seems unlikely I will go through with it. Especially with a one year old boy and another child on the way.”

The drive and determination that Logan has should be a motivation to everyone. His life has certainly had its ups and downs. But he hopes to start a new chapter in his life while starting a family.