Matt O'Connnell Blog

Located at Morningside College

Article 2 Draft

Fake news, corrupt media, treason, spy, those are just a few words that President Trump has used in reference to American citizens during the last week.  American citizens are now using only one word in reference to President Trump, impeachment. 

President Trump’s phone call on July 25, 2019 to Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelenskiy is the center of the House Democrats’ impeachment inquiry.  A transcript of the call made public by the White House showed President Trump asked Zelenskiy to look into why Ukraine’s top prosecutor ended an investigation into a Ukrainian gas company. That once employed Vice President Joe Biden’s son as a board member.  Messages given to Congress and released by House Democrats suggest the call was part of a broader effort by Trump and his administration to pressure Ukraine.

The messages show how U.S. Ambassadors worked to persuade Ukraine to publicly commit to investigating Trumps political opponents. Explicitly linking the inquiry to whether Ukraine’s President would be granted an official visit to the White House.

President Trump has also publicly stated that China should start an investigation into Joe Biden. 

President Trump is no stranger to attacking his political rivals, this week is no different.  With House Democrats pursuing an impeachment inquiry, the President is lashing out at new and old targets. President Trump has also publicly stated that China should start an investigation into Joe Biden. 

This week at an Iowa town hall a local resident confronted Republican Senator Joni Ernst. Asking a important question about the President. “Where’s the line?” Haskins asked at the town hall. “When are you guys going to say, enough,” and stand up and say, “I’m not backing any of this?” Republicans need to ask themselves just how far the President will go if they don’t start setting boundaries.  

Republican lawmakers have mostly been silent on the President’s comments. Only a handful have spoken out including Sen. Mitt Romney of Utah and Ben Sasse of Nebraska. They agreed that the call was bad, but the majority of the GOP officials stayed silent. Republicans have never really been able to stop Trump from being Trump and have often paid a price when they have tried. 

According to NPR, an analysis finds Trump’s use of heated phrases such as “lamestream media,” “coup,” “treason,” “enemy of the people,” and “corrupt media” jumped beginning of March of this year. October is on pace to set a record. The President said “Bullshit” in the middle of a long speech last March at the Conservative Political Action Conference in reference to the Democrats investigation. Since then similar language has been exceeding commonplace. “I’m glad he just said it via Twitter and hasn’t done it in the Rose Garden yet,” said Sam Nunberg, who was the Presidents advisor in the early part of his campaign.   

Sources

Blake, Aaron. “’Where Is the Line?’: A Joni Ernst Town Hall Questioner Sums up the GOP’s Trump Dilemma.” The Washington Post, WP Company, 4 Oct. 2019, https://www.washingtonpost.com/politics/2019/10/04/where-is-line-joni-ernst-town-hall-questioner-sums-up-gops-trump-dilemma/.

Bennett, Geoff, et al. “Trump Blames Energy Secretary Rick Perry for Ukraine Call at Center of Impeachment Inquiry.” NBCNews.com, NBCUniversal News Group, 6 Oct. 2019, https://www.nbcnews.com/politics/trump-impeachment-inquiry/trump-blames-energy-secretary-rick-perry-ukraine-call-center-impeachment-n1062931.

Keith, Tamara. “’Treason,’ ‘Spy,’ ‘Coup’: As Impeachment Talk Intensifies, So Does Trump’s Rhetoric.” NPR, NPR, 5 Oct. 2019, https://www.npr.org/2019/10/05/767224186/treason-spy-coup-as-impeachment-talk-intensifies-so-does-trump-s-rhetoric.

1 Comment

  1. It looks really good I really enjoyed reading it.
    Maybe put, what the abbreviations stand for for example NPR

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