“’Miracle on Ice’ star Mark Pavelich declared incompetent for trial in assault case” by Robert Gearty news comment

Robert Gearty writes about NHL hockey player and Olympic “Miracle on Ice” gold medalist, Mark Pavelich being found unfit because of mental illness in his assault case. In August, he was charged after beating his neighbor with a meatal pipe, accusing him of spiking his beer after a fishing trip. His sister spoke of how kind he always had been, blaming the act on possible chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE) developed because of hockey. 

The newsworthy value of this story is prominence as well as bizarre. At the beginning of the article, Gearty even introduces the assault suspect in a way that recognizes what Pavelich is known for, being a “Miracle on Ice” Olympic hockey player. It’s bizarre because when people think of Olympic gold medalists, they don’t usually coin them as being a criminal. It has the shock factor that makes this such an interesting story.

It was strange to me that they told of some of Pavelich’s achievements at the end of the story, giving him a bit more of a story. Even though it follows the inverted triangle, as it should, I feel like stories about criminals need to be more relevant to the now event of what is happening. It makes me think back to the Brock Turner stories. Where Turner was given a reason of why he raped the girl and listed what he was involved in at school and his grades and great reputation as a swimmer. Those facts have nothing to do with the case yet news stories still include them to give the suspect substance, make the story more interesting.

“Wildfires are burning across California. A new round of dangerous winds could make them worse” by Joe Sutton news comment

Joe Sutton reports that there are more than 26 million people from California to Arizona is under red flag warnings today, meaning fire danger. There have been 11 fires this past week that have displaced tens of thousands of people, ordering them to evacuate their homes. This week weather’s forecast includes powerful winds that are supposed to be up to 60-70 mph. These winds will worsen the conditions of the fire, more than they are right now. 

This article was half way down on CNN’s front page, which I think is surprising. Even though all the news with Trump is nationally recognized, I think 11 wildfires that are affecting more than 26 million and forcing tens of thousands of people out of their homes is a bit more newsworthy than the latest Trump scandal, that has been going on ever since he became president. I asked a couple of my classmates if they knew about the fires and they told me no. This just shows how uninformed people are, the most of what they’ve heard is most likely a photo on Twitter. Other than that, I did like the separation Sutton used to differentiate between two different kinds of fires, titling sections and describing some impacts of the specific fires. It will be interesting how the news coverage will be different after the winds occur and what CNN will cover and who they will interview.

Broadcast story; Sleeping giant may soon awaken

Spoken by Morningside sophomore Maleah Richter.

Long inactive Russian volcano could possibly erupt due to beneath surface rumbling.

According to Science News, a volcano on Russia’s Kamchatka Peninsula, named Bolshaya Udina, has been dormant for at least ten thousand years but could potentially erupt in the near future due to beneath surface seismic rumbles. Yet, some researchers argue that the seismic rumbling could be related to active volcanoes nearby.

Late in 2017, scientists began noticing an increase of seismic activity near the volcano, so Russian geophysicist Ivan Koulakov and a team of researchers installed four temporary seismic stations near Bolshaya Udina to track the activity. Since then, there have been two thousand four hundred seismic events recorded, with five hundred earthquakes occurring in only two short months.

On top of the seismic activity, Koulakov’s team found a possible pocket of fluid, perhaps magma, underneath Bolshaya Udina. Because of the activity and detection of magma, it is quite possible that the volcano is emerging from extinction.

If this is true, catastrophic affect is extremely unlikely because there is less than eleven-thousand people living in a one-hundred-kilometer radius of the volcano. 

Although the seismic activity and magma may be evidence of the awakening volcano, other scientists are not convinced because the plumbing underneath Kamchatka’s volcanoes is complex and so the eruption may be destined for a different volcano.

Media Comparison

Print story: https://www.cnn.com/2019/10/23/asia/hong-kong-taiwan-murder-intl-hnk/index.html

Broadcast story: https://www.cnn.com/specials/latest-news-videos

Both leads address the who and what but the broadcast least gives more detail, saying that the “suspect vows to return to Hong Kong and turn himself in”, whereas the print lead only says he “walks free”.  The broadcast version is focused on the suspect apologizing and his plans for after he is released but gives no specific background information on why he killed his girlfriend or what protests occurred because of the murder. The print story, however, immediately addresses the protests and connects the two events (the murder and the protests), giving readers background information on why this man walking free is important. The broadcast story only uses one quote from Chan, the murder suspect, though the print story includes quotes from Chan as well as from the Hong Kong government. The attribution is clearly stated in print, telling us who said it but the broadcast story recorded an interview with Chan and just used a clip from there. Obviously, the broadcast story has a bit of an advantage with the video and images they incorporate, choosing to show videos of Chan being interviewed as well as videos from the broadcast, played when the reporter spoke of the protests for a second. The sound they chose to use was background nose of reporters asking questions, people screaming while protesting, and Chan speaking in his native language in an interview. The print story, however, has the broadcast story attached at the beginning as well as a video at the bottom (which would not allow me to access it) of the protests in Hong Kong. No sound or pictures were used in the print version. I think the thing I found most interesting regarding the differences of the two stories was how little the broadcast story offered about the whole event. It merely presented just the current event, disregarding the possible need of background information the reader may need to know to be more informed about the issue.

“Decoding Dementia” by Tara Losinski news comment

Losinski starts her article off with the statement that “564,000 Canadians currently live with a form of dementia”. And though dementia is a common risk for older people, recent breakthroughs in science are providing optimism for a cure. Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis came up with a  test that detects change in the brain that can lead to Alzheimer’s. A neurological change is hard to cure due to the challenge of getting past the blood-brain barrier. To open this barrier, an ultrasound they developed will use microbubbles and sound waves. The article goes on to provide prevention tips, saying that a healthy diet and life style is certainly one way to decrease the risk factor.

As an informative article, I think this article did a great job at including all the components readers would be curious about. The news value it falls under is impact. Knowing that science is learning more about dementia and the causes and possible preventions can one day prevent Alzheimer’s in hundreds, possibly thousands, of people. This information was broken up so readers could find the diagnosis, treatment, prevention, diet, and exercise. I think that for the type of article it was, it worked well!

“Florida Man Donates Nearly $1,000 to Pay Off Entire Town’s School Lunch Debt” by Joelle Goldstein news comment

Goldstein reports on Andrew Levy deciding to pay off more than 400 kids’ school lunch debt in the town of Jupiter, Florida. His reason for paying off the children’s debt is because he was astonished by the number of students in debt and wanted to help out the community that he’s fallen in love with. Having no children or personal connections to the schools, it’s a simple act of kindness. Levy’s actions inspired others to also come forward donate and he says he is planning on organizing a fundraiser in the community four times per year to help out those families in debt.

To start with, the article’s title was a bit misleading. The title includes “entire town’s school lunch debt”, but once you begin reading the article further, it says he only paid off 400 kids’ debt. There was still a lot of debt to be paid off so phrasing it that way made me assume he paid a lot more. I was curious about the motivation of the act, so I’m glad it was closer to the beginning of the story. I could see how the inverted triangle format could’ve been used but I think it’s arguable if the fundraiser Levy is holding is more important and should be closer to the beginning than it was. 

“LGBTQ rights hang in the balance at the Supreme Court. Elizabeth Warren and Pete Buttigieg just released plans to defend them.” By Anna North and Ella Nielsen news comment

This article focused on the plan that both Senator Elizabeth Warren and the first openly gay presidential candidate, Mayor Pete Buttigieg, released to the CNN town halls that are supposed to protect the rights of LGBTQ Americans. The article goes on to talk about the specifics of the plan, the legislation, executive actions, and the policies some advocates critique the plan on lacking. LGBTQ rights haven’t been a huge focus in the debates at this point of the political campaigns but some forums will be focusing on them as election time gets closer.

I thought this article was unnecessarily long. It was wordy and repeated itself in certain sections, especially sections where they would mention Buttigieg. And though it was long, the transitions were clear and smooth. They used phrases like “Warren was not the only candidate…” and “The plans don’t encompass all the reforms…” to prepare the reader for more information. Just, again, I just think that the re-introduction to Buttigieg in the section meant for advocates’ critiques made the article seem repetitive and ruined its flow. 

“Marine veteran walked 810 miles in 42 days for veteran suicide awareness” by Ella Torres News Comment

Ella Torres reported on Travis Snyder, a 32 year-old veteran, who, on Sunday, finished walking around Lake Michigan for 42 days to raise awareness. His need for wanting people to be aware of veteran suicide stemmed a year after he returned home from being deployed in Afghanistan. He learned that a close friend he worked with committed suicide. Snyder wanted this walk to cause people to become more aware of available resources as well as start a conversation on the issue. In result, he met hundreds of new people and learned their stories.

I thought this article was formatted in a story-telling type way. It started off with Snyder’s reason of why he chose to walk and then, from there, got into what exactly he was doing to raise awareness and how people were being affected by it. The title of the article was descriptive and drew people in, so Torres probably thought it be best to build the suspense and offer background knowledge to her readers before jumping right in. I really liked how the article ended with a quote from Snyder. Torres used the quote to capture Snyder’s purpose of walking, ending the article with a hopeful tone, but making sure not to incorporate any of her own opinions on the topic.

Greta Thunberg Speech

Yesterday at the United Nations Climate Action Summit, sixteen-year-old Swedish climate activist, Greta Thunberg, successfully convinced 65 countires to change their emmissions efforts by warning world leaders “that change is coming, whether [they] like it or not”.

To begin her speech, Thunberg is asked what her message to world leaders is and, almost immediately, Thunberg bursts out that “we will be watching you”. 

The “we” she refers to is the younger generation “who have to live with the consequences” of the apparent lack of urgency to solve the climate change issue.

The message continues and Thunberg only gets angrier, projecting her need for change by shaming those who have the power to do something and aren’t. Most of this anger is fueled by the fact that she is a child and has to be speaking to adults about the importance of the issue.

“You have stolen my dreams and my childhood with your empty words. And yet, I’m onre of the lucky ones. People are suffering. People are dying. Entire ecosystems are collapsing. We are in the beginning of a mass extinction, and all you can talk about is money and fairy tales of eternal economic growth. How dare you!”

And, although she is warning world leaders of the disappointment her generation feels towards them, she is also warning them of the realization her own generation is having. 

“The young people are starting to understand your betrayal. The eyes of all future generations are upon you. And if you choose to fail us, I say: We will never forgive you.”

At the end of the day, Thunberg’s urgency of the climate change issue got through to 65 countries, announcing efforts to achieve net-zero emissions by the year 2050. 

Article #2 Revised: Full-time students at Morningside College work diverse jobs, on and off campus.

Morningside College students give insight on the advantages and disadvantages of working different types of jobs while in school.

Photo courtesy of http://www.ciu.edu/campus-life/career-experience/on-campus-employment

Before even applying for a job, students must first decide if they want to get a job on or off campus. Those who are offered work study through financial aid have an easier time making this decision.

Maddie Dotzler, Morningside’s work study and student financial coordinator, works directly with students on finding jobs and keeps them up to date with open positions on campus via email. Dotzler encourages getting a job on campus for any student involved in athletics or extracurriculars. 

“Campus employers manipulate the work schedule to go around their open times when they do not have practice and classes,” Dotzler says. 

Maleah Richter, sophomore and soccer player, was offered work study on campus and now has two jobs on campus: one in the business office and one on the campus set-up crew.

“I knew Morningside had basically guaranteed me a job on campus when I saw that I was eligible for work study. I thought it was the smarter choice to go with a job they had for me here because it eliminated the need for transportation and gave me flexible hours,” Richter said.

Students not eligible for work study might consider working a job off-campus, gaining outside benefits that the school’s campus payroll could not offer them through a job on-campus.

“The best benefit of working an off-campus job is probably the pay, but it is a bit more difficult to adjust my schedule,” said freshman Kelly Nguyen, a Wal-Mart employee. “At first, my work schedule did interfere with tennis practices because of the amount of hours I was working.”

To balance working almost 26 hours a week, on top of being a full-time student athlete, Nguyen keeps a planner with her daily responsibilities.

“I also try to throw study sessions into my day, like when I’m waiting for my next class to start,” Nguyen said.

Most students are grateful to be paid higher wages and get scheduled more hours at an off-campus job, but many do not understand the difficulties of balancing a part-time job with classes and activities until they have experienced it first-hand.

Sophomore Karlie Reagan worked as a server at Texas Roadhouse her freshman year but chose to get a new job when she returned to campus. Reagan now works as a tutor and study hall proctor for the wrestling team.

“Texas Roadhouse had better pay but couldn’t compete with the ease of a campus job. On campus, you don’t have to worry about driving anywhere or working with people you don’t know or don’t trust,” Reagan said. 

For Reagan, a new job meant yet another hiring process. She said that the school had an effective way of hiring students, especially if they previously had any sort of on-campus position. 

“You don’t have to do paperwork, you just have to contact the right people,” Reagan stated.

Other students have decided that the experience of the job is just as important as the money earned is. Because of this, they actually have two jobs – one on campus and one off campus.

Junior Hailey Barrus works both as a Morningside student ambassador in the admissions office and as a barista at Stone Bru Coffee. This has proved to be challenging, but also possible because Barrus is determined and strong-willed.

“I have class most days from 8am-3pm then I usually go to work from 3:30-6:30 and, then, in the evening I usually catch up on homework or have rehearsal for something I am involved in,” Barrus said.

Even though she is busy, Barrus sees having an additional off-campus job as a way to network and practice professional skills required for her anticipated career.

“It is a different atmosphere that allows me to branch out to people that are not on campus. Both of these jobs, I feel, prepare me for the future because I am constantly using my communication skills,” Barrus said.

Whatever job a student may decide to get, Dotzler encourages them to communicate with friends, teammates, and classmates about their work experiences. 

“I think that a lot of communication helps students figure out what they would like and not like in a job, especially while they have other obligations to school,” Dotzler says.