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Modern medicine is changing quickly and going to save millions of lives. Biologists and nurses alike are excited to see how these new medicines and treatments will change not only their jobs but the people around them.

Article 1

Cystic Fibrosis is a deadly disease that affects many across the nation. Luckily there is a drug showing promising results to help fight this illness. ”The triple-combination drug therapy, known as Trikafta. Last week, the Food and Drug Administration approved Trikafta for use with about 90 percent of patients with cystic fibrosis — those who have the most common cystic fibrosis gene mutation and are 12 or older,” stated by The New York Times. While this is not the full cure when it comes to this disease this is a great start and will help so many people. Drew Binning, nursing major stated, (insert quotes) The publics’ number one concern when it comes to this drug is the price. The company assures it does have patience-assistant programs in place to help. 

Article 2

The first steps to ending cancer. A new process that is safe and feasible is being tested in the medical field. They are editing the patient’s DNA to have the body attack cancer cells. There have been three patients and all three are still alive, healthy and fighting. Skyler Briggs Biology and Chemistry major stated, (insert quotes). Dr. Stadtmauer talked about in an interview with the New York Times, that this is only the beginning, also that science is always changing and evolving. That this is just opening up a whole world of manipulation of cells to be whatever the imagination can think of.

Article 3

One of the most lethal diseases, tuberculosis, has a new experimental vaccine that has protected about half the people who got it. “While a 50 percent success rate is hardly ideal — the measles vaccine, by contrast, is about 98 percent protective — about 10 million people get tuberculosis each year and 1.6 million dies of it. Even a partially effective vaccine may save millions of lives,” according to The New York Times.  Drew Binning, nursing major stated, (insert quotes). The vaccine is still in testing stages but has been tested in about 3,300 adults in Kenya, South Africa, and Zambia. “All of them already had latent tuberculosis — a silent infection that might or might not progress to active tuberculosis. Of those who got two doses of the GSK vaccine, only 13 developed active tuberculosis during three years of follow-up, according to the new study published in The New England Journal of Medicine. By contrast, 26 of those who got a placebo progressed to active tuberculosis,” according to the New York Times. There is still a ways to go and this isn’t the final Vaccine but it is a strong start in the right direction.

Modern medicine has still a way to go but, is making strides in the right direction. And will hopefully be able to save millions of lives in the future.

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