Month: October 2015

What the Students Want

What the Students Want

By Tori Figge

One organization on campus that holds power and can affect the outcome of student groups is student government.

Organization and management of student life by various student groups is critical to student involvement. This involvement is coordinated through student government. Student governments nationwide have formed to create a voice for students. They are the academic, cultural, and social affairs of the college.

Conversations took place about what students think student government is and how they can better campus.

“Student government makes Morningside College more functional. We are the voice of the students and as students we can relate with them (students) on various aspects of student life,” said senior senate representative, Kari Miller.

This senator claimed student government is the bridge between students and faculty/staff. As students themselves, student government members can take the information and bring it to whomever it is required to make the change on campus. Student government members must be the change they want to see.  These members are elected by the students, for the students.

“Student government doesn’t do enough, but they do what they can with what they have,” one student said. Expanding on this the student feels like student government doesn’t have the power to carry out some ideas they need to, referring to the budget. “Look at other institutions around us, they have way more money to put on events.”

A branch of student government coincides with Morningside Activities Council. MAC and student government correspond together, as the vice president of student government is the president of MAC. MAC has their own budget to display events on and off campus for students.

The holder of these positions is junior, Diane Nguyen. Nguyen states, “The role as vice president of student government and MAC president goes very well together because I serve as the bridge between two key groups on campus. We are sister organizations so we aren’t blindsided by what each group does.”

Events provided by MAC incorporate various involvement opportunities for students. Student government also provides involvement opportunities. Students wishing to become a group must do so through student government.

Being a registered student group on campus allows students to involve more students of all fields. You see groups pertaining to academic studies, international affairs, political affairs, and groups that just want to create a fun environment for all.

Once registered as an official group, these students can ask for allocation funding for their events they wish to attend or hold. This is done through presentation to the student government senate.

One veteran senator stated, “This year we are more stingy on giving out money. More questions are asked to the person who is presenting and we really debate on how they can bring their information obtained back to Morningside College. Everything we do needs to be for the betterment of the college.”

Bettering the college is a goal every student organization on campus should keep in mind. Students have different interests and with more groups on campus, this creates more involvement.

Death Penalty States Face Hurdles in Carrying Out Executions

The Supreme Court ruled a controversial drug to be used for lethal injections in Oklahoma, however death-penalty states are finding it harder to carry out executions as they struggle to obtain and properly use limited supplies of ever-changing combinations of lethal injection drugs.

Executions in some states have been postponed where others states are buying the lethal drug overseas. The FDA states importing this drug is illegal and over time lethal injection has become more chaotic. In states such as Tennessee, Oklahoma, and Louisiana, when lethal-injection drugs were unavailable the states were approved to use other methods. This includes firing squads, nitrogen gas, and the electric chair. Thirty-one states are death penalty states.

This story is noteworthy is various aspects. The lead is effective yet a bit lengthy. The audience are people throughout the United States, especially those who reside in one of the thirty-one death penalty states. The use of illegal drugs to execute an offender does not seem like justice. I think this story is very powerful in the sense that the states are using whatever method they choose to carry out an execution. Legislation varies state to state, and Nebraska for example, is trying to abolish capital punishment. It will be interesting to read more about this topic as times goes on and more information is released.

http://www.nytimes.com/2015/10/09/us/death-penalty-lethal-injection.html?hp&action=click&pgtype=Homepage&module=first-column-region®ion=top-news&WT.nav=top-news&_r=0 

Morningside Professor Thrives Internationally

Morningside College has an array of people on campus. One professor who has a refined understanding and appreciation of culture is Dr. Patrick Blaine.

Blaine is a sixth year professor at Morningside College, teaching in the English and modern languages department as well as a C&C professor for first year students. Dr. Patrick Blaine is a University of Iowa undergrad and University of Washington graduate. Besides teaching in the classroom, you may see Dr. Patrick Blaine advising. He works with the International Student Association, Sustainable Environment, Spanish Club, and is a current faculty advisor for Omicron Delta Kappa.

As an English and Spanish professor, Blaine is fluent in both languages and can dabble in various other languages. His language fluency has led him on many adventures abroad, as he has traveled to Spain, Italy, Argentina, Mexico, Peru, Vietnam, Cambodia, Puerto Rico and most importantly Chile where he met his wife, Monica.

Off campus, Blaine stays busy with various activities. This includes being president of the KWIT board radio station 90.3, Siouxland Institute of Film board, vice president of the Mary Treglia community house, executive committee of the Latin America Association, and works on language proficiency testing for the Sioux City Police Department. Outside of his activities, he is currently working on his new house with his wife of thirteen years, Monica. The Blaines are renovating a 1913 house with detailed architecture. Dr. Patrick Blaine has a passion for cooking and beer making, enjoys biochemistry, and riding his motorcycle.

Health Law Revision Approved

The Senate passed legislation on Thursday intended to protect small and midsize businesses from increases in health insurance premiums, clearing the bill for President Obama’s expect signature.

The action by Congress was a rare example of bipartisan agreement on how to revise the Affordable Care Act.

The lead on this new story seemed a bit lengthy but all the information was relevant to the point that was trying to be portrayed. The Affordable Care Act provides Americans with better health security by putting in place health insurance reforms. These reforms will expand coverage, hold companies accountable, lower health care costs, and enhance the quality of care for all Americans.

The bill is focused on organizations that are defined as a small employers, including 51-100 employees. I believe this new story is relevant because it affects Americans throughout our whole country. The impact the story portrays is in depth and summarizes the main points. If the Senate gave the rundown of the whole bill procedure in this article, it would not be one many would read.

http://www.nytimes.com/2015/10/02/us/health-law-revision-is-approved.html?ref=us&_r=0 

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