Jesus Cendejas Profile

December 14, 2017

jesus

According Laura Garcia, Jesus Cedejas’ journey in life “is to be spiritual, connected and helpful.” The International Student Association president sees her advisor as “one of the most transparent individuals” that she knows.

Jesus Cendejas, originally from California says that it was a step of faith coming to Morningside College. “In all respects, spiritually and in the entirety of that journey, I trusted that this is where I was being led. I had no family or friends out here, so everything was new and didn’t know what to expect.”

Before he was the International Student Advisor, Cendejas attained a Religious Studies degree from Morningside College. As a student, Cendejas was a resident assistant (RA), a member of Campus Ministries, and the Student Alumni Association.

“I became very involved from the moment I arrived on campus with many organizations and with people,” he said.

Cendejas gave up his RA job because he didn’t believe that it allowed him to be involved enough. “I had a friend, who was also my resident, and he suffered from mental health problems. Because of my job at the college I couldn’t be emotionally invested, so I quit,” Cendejas said.

Cendejas is fascinated by religious studies, social and community involvement. When asked about religion Cedejas said “It leads you to understand the world you live in. Part of what I did right after graduation and continue to do today directly and indirectly relates to my major. I served at my church, Calvary Chapel, for a while and soon after became ordained as a staff pastor in April 2014.”

At that time Cendejas was offered a job at a local organization called the Mary J. Treglia Community House; he previously volunteered there for his service learning class.

The Mary J. Treglia Community House focuses on helping the Siouxland immigrant population assimilate into the community, whether it is through English as a second language (ESL) classes, translation and interpreting services, or legal services, among many other things.

“This part is how my degree was used indirectly, since we dealt with many different cultures,” Cendejas said.

In the summer of 2015, Cendejas joined the staff of Morningside College. He mentors and aids international students throughout their college careers.

“I am a full-time staff pastor at church and part-time advisor at Morningside College,” he said.

Cendejas believes that the community at Morningside is unforgettable.

“It helped shape and mold me into the person I am today,” he said. “It was a good place, it’s been almost six years since I graduated and I’m still here. That has to say a lot of how much I appreciate the college.”

Cendejas believes that keeping a connection with the college is important because it means helping with the future of the college.

“Those that cared for you during your college career were made up of not just faculty, but those who chose to stay connected, the alumni,” he said. “They all invested in you in one way or another and helped shape you into the person you are today. By staying connected, one is given many opportunities to do the same and invest in others.”

Nancy Medel a senior and the vice president of International Student Association describes Cendejas as the kindest person she has ever met and. Medel says that she talks to Cendejas when she gets nervous about graduation. “He has the gentlest soul… He always listens and cares. He seems to have his life together and he knows people; so when I want advice about life after graduation I talk to him.”

 

Article #3 Draft

November 9, 2017

Do midwesterners care about the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA?

On September 5th, president Donald Trump announced his intentions to rescind DACA.

It implemented in August 2012 through an executive order by  former president Barack Obama. DACA’s role was to  protect illegal immigrant children. It provided the opportunity of legal  study and  work.

The rescinding of DACA has created nationwide discussion. At Morningside College in Sioux City, Iowa the Spanish Club recently organized an informative event on campus.

Evelyn Hernandez, the president of Spanish club implied that young adults getting deported on the west coast may not be newsworthy to college students in the Midwest. Hernandez believes it is the duty of the club to bring about awareness.

* voice clip* “Our goal is to inform people about DACA and the repercussions’ of the abolishment.”

Veronica Mullen, a member of the Spanish club reinforced Hernandez’ views.

*voice clip* “They [the Morningside community] know what DACA stand for but no the details per say. We are definitely trying to raise awareness due to the current political environment and let the community know that we can do something about”

The Spanish club is attempting to create a call to action. The current goal of the club is to get students to contact their senate representative.

Mullen said that, “most students are willing to contact their representatives and let them know the support DACA.”

Aaron Montanez, a student at Morningside College and a native of California believes that college students in general care about social and political issues. He also believe that the rescindment of DACA doesn’t “hit home” in Sioux City, Iowa.

“Honestly I can’t speak for midwesterners. I haven’t seen much of a reaction either for or against.  Students at the college, at least those I know, seem to care and be mad; but I feel like that’s a pretty common consensus amongst college students.”

Montanez explains that the social climate California is more skittish in regards to the rescindment of DACA.

“Friends and family are jumpy and on edge. We all know someone who is being threatened. People are scared and  mad.  It’s almost like the old west or something.”

 


CBS news reports that the deadly mass shooting in US History occurred 30 miles outside of San Antonio Texas on Sunday.

26 year old Devin Patrick Kelley opened fire inside Sutherland Springs First Baptist Church killing about 26 people and injuring  20.

Kelly was dressed in all black and tactical gear when he opened fire with an assault rifle.

As he fled the scene a resident confronted and shot Kelly.

Kelly managed to drive away but police officials  found him dead in his vehicle by a self-inflicted  gunshot wound.

for reference  and recored sources


Two years after the the bike brawl in Waco Texas, a trial has begun.

In 2015, 9 people were shot and killed at the Twin Peaks restaurant following an argument between rival motorcycle gangs.

134 people were arrested and charged.

for reference and recorded sources 

more

Emma Watson Story

November 9, 2017

Last night, at the UK-based charity One Young World, actor and activist Emma Watson emphasized that gender equality is more important than any other goals, because it intertwines with all goals of  the charity.

One Young World gathers  young leaders from around the world and aids them in making lasting connections to create positive change.

Watson encouraged the participants of the One Young World forum with seven statements that has helped her on her journey.

“I am willing to be seen. I am willing to speak up. I am willing to keep going. I am willing to listen to what others have to say. I am willing to go forward even when I feel alone. I am willing to go to bed each night, at peace with myself. I am willing to be my biggest, best-est, most powerful self.”

When Watson publicly began her activist journey she didn’t see herself as an activist but simply wanted to be an example of proactivity.

“It had never been about being an activist; it was about the choice to make myself visible and the choices that you made to do that too.”

Watson called the participants of the forum her tribe and encouraged them to work together.

“For the first time in my life, I found my sisterhood; a brotherhood—whatever, however you want to describe it—I found my tribe.”

“One Young World isn’t about saying what I, each of us individually, can do, but what we can do, working together, supporting and listening to each other.”

Article #2 Final

November 8, 2017

The Local Discussion of the Rescindment of DACA

On September 5th, president Donald Trump announced his intentions to rescind Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA).

DACA was implemented in August 2012 through an executive order by  former president Barack Obama. DACA was implemented to protect illegal immigrant children. It provided the opportunity of legal  study and  work.

The rescinding of DACA has created nationwide discussion. At Morningside College in Sioux City, Iowa the Spanish Club recently organized an informative event on campus.

The Morningside College Spanish Club sought to enlighten individuals around campus of the implications of Differed Action for Childhood Arrival (DACA) going away.

Evelyn Hernandez, the president of Spanish club implied that young adults getting deported on the west coast may not be newsworthy to college students in the Midwest.

Hernandez believes it is the duty of the club to bring about awareness. “Our goal is to inform people about DACA and the repercussions’ of the abolishment.”

Veronica Mullen, a member of the Spanish club reinforced Hernandez’ views. “They [the Morningside community] know what DACA stand for but no the details per say. We are definitely trying to raise awareness due to the current political environment and let the community know that we can do something about”

The Spanish club is attempting to create a call to action. The current goal of the club is to get students to contact their senate representative.

Mullen said that, “most students are willing to contact their representatives and let them know the support DACA.”

Aaron Montanez, a student at Morningside College and a native of California believes that college students in general care about social and political issues. He also believe that the rescindment of DACA doesn’t “hit home” in Sioux City, Iowa.

“Honestly I can’t speak for midwesterners. I haven’t seen much of a reaction either for or against.  Students at the college, at least those I know, seem to care and be mad; but I feel like that’s a pretty common consensus amongst college students.”

Montanez explains that the social climate California is more skittish in regards to the rescindment of DACA.

“Friends and family are jumpy and on edge. We all know someone who is being threatened. People are scared and  mad.  It’s almost like the old west or something.”

 

News Comment Week 11

November 7, 2017

I watched the CNN update via Snapchat. Their headlines stories and condensed and presented broadcast style. This story was about President Donald Trump’s trip to Asia and included Trump’s comments (speech) on the Texas shooting Massacre. Unlike most of his speeches, this snippet of his comments were solemn and refined. Trump said that based on preliminary reports, mental health is the issue. He  reinforced that the massacre was not a gun issue and rather one on mental health.  Trump reinforced his views by saying “We [America] has a lot of mental health problems in our country as do other countries but this isn’t s gun situation.”

In this speech Donald Trump was the  sender, the  message was that the Texas massacre was not a gun control problem but a mental health problem, the audience was America via the press.

Shooting

October 24, 2017

 

An interesting start to the honeymoon phase after a husband shot his wife in the stomach.

The newlywed is said to be in stable condition following a shooting incident at her wedding reception. The husband, Richard Bronson’s whereabouts are currently unknown.

It was reported that Laurette Bronson threw a plate of macaroni salad at her husband. He then shot her in the stomach and left abruptly.

A neighbor Walter Corse witnessed the incident *audio snippet*.

The family is keeping mum about the incident. Laurette Bronson requests privacy *audio snippet*.

Science Scavenger Hunt

October 17, 2017

Just like humans, fishes get depressed. We cannot ask animals how they feel, but they show us.

The similarly of human and fish neuro-chemistry, makes it easy to test the effectiveness of antidepressants.

Dr Julian Pittman, from Troy University, Alabama, is working on a new anti-depressant. An article from the New York Times reports, that Dr Pittman uses fishes as antidepressant, test subjects.

Pittman likes working with fishes. This is because they are obvious about their depression. Pittman pointed out that, the neuro-chemistry of fishes, and humans, is very similar.

Pittman uses a procedure called the “novel tank test.” He drops a fish in a new tank and monitors its behavior. If after five minutes the fish is swimming at the top; it is exploring the new en-vi-ron-met. This implies that it is not depressed. If the fish is hanging out at the lower half of the tank, it is depressed.

Pittman has induced depression in fish. He kept a fish drunk on ethanol for two weeks. Pittman then cut off the supply and forced withdrawal. He then gave the depressed fish an anti-depressant. Pittman determine that if the antidepressant is effective, the fish will swim to the top within two weeks.

According to Pittman, the amount of time a fish spends at the top versus the bottom shows the severity of the depression.

The info for the above broadcast story was taken from Fish Depression Is Not a Joke, by Heather Murphy, The New York Times.

 

News Comment #8

October 12, 2017

Since we are currently going over broadcast reporting I decided to listen to a bit of news on NPR’s morning edition via KTIV. I also found and linked the  NPR story below.

The broadcast story was about President Donald Trump signing an executive order today that allows groups ( trade groups etc)  of people to buy health coverage.

The reporters used short and concise statements while broadcasting. The ‘flow’ of the story seemed faster than print articles that you could read via the New York Times etc. Quotes were sometimes actually snippets and commentary from the reporters explained, and move the story along.

NPR Story 

The Morningside College Spanish Club seeks to enlighten individuals around campus of the implications of Differed Action for Childhood Arrival (DACA) going away.

Evelyn Hernandez, the president of Spanish club implied that young adults getting deported in the west coast may not be newsworthy to college students in the Midwest.

Hernandez believes it is the duty of the club to bring about awareness. “Our goal is to inform people about DACA and the repercussions’ of the abolishment.”

Veronica Mullen, a member of the Spanish club reinforced Hernandez’ views. “They [the Morningside community] know what DACA stand for but no the details per say. We are definitely trying to raise awareness due to the current political environment and let the community know that we can do something about”

The Spanish club is attempting to create a call to action. The current goal of the club is to get students to contact their senate representative.

Mullen said that, “most students are willing to contact their representatives and let them know the support DACA.”

The rest of the article is pending an interview from Lilian Lopez to provide a more legalistic and activist viewpoint and student Aaron montane who has friends and relatives that are directly affected by DACA.

Jacob Ariston Interview

October 5, 2017

If someone was to ask Jacob Ariston what kind of person he was; he would say that he is a “stupid A**hole.” That is just a front. Ariston believes he’s actually kind and fearless.

Ariston grew up in Santa Ana, Orange County, California under the supervision of his grandmother. She worked three jobs to support he and his two sisters.

They would sometimes stay at the houses of different aunts while his grandmother was at work. It was at an aunts’ house Jacob almost drowned and got his right arm set on fire.

One Saturday, while he was in second grade, he was playing by the pool and fell into the deep end. He struggled to get back to the surface. “I was flaying my arms and kicking but I wasn’t getting anywhere. I couldn’t breath, but I wasn’t scared, I felt empty.”

Ariston’s aunt saw him and got him to safety. For a while he called her his idol. When Ariston was in elementary school he remembers recounting the story to her.

“She told me that she thought I was just some kid messing around. I lost my respect for her. She didn’t intentionally save me and she didn’t even know it was me.” Ariston says that he then viewed her as irresponsible. “She was supposed to be watching me, I could have died and she would have thought that I was just a random kid messing around in the pool.”

Ariston was being monitored by another aunt when his arm caught fire. His arm hair was singed. “She was at our house and couldn’t really operate the gas stove,” ariston recounts. “She left the burner on, then asked me to light it. I just remember a combustion and my arm engulfed in blue flame. I’m not afraid of fire though.”

Ariston says he doesn’t like the concept of fear and refuses to let past trauma affect him. He goes to Riverside Park (an hour away from Santa Ana) with his family, and always go through the enclosed water slides. The blackness around him initially takes his breath away. He hyperventilates but then manages to calm himself.

Ariston is currently a freshman at Morningside College. He is on a Nicholas Academic Center scholarship. He is majoring in Engineering Science because he wants to make a lot of money to support his family. Ariston also wants to make a difference. He sees Engineers as creators and also as individuals who make current inventions better.

Ariston want people to know he’s worth something. “I want people to remember me as someone who was worth at least an hour to listen to or to meet with.  And in that hour I would have changed or affected you in some kind of way.”